Redesign in Account Reconciliation Cloud Service (ARCS): From the Ground Up

We talked about adding new scope in New Scope in Account Reconciliation Cloud Service (ARCS): Add-Ons and modifying your application inside (i.e. changing reconciliation methods) and outside of ARCS (i.e. new data feeds) in Modifications in Account Reconciliation Cloud Service (ARCS): Tweaking and Tuning.

Today, we’re going to tear it down and rebuild from the ground up.

Let me start with this:  redesign IS possible. ARCS does not permanently punish any design decisions made on “Day 1,”…but not all changes are equal in complexity, nor can all changes be made without consequence. A successful implementation ensures that the application design is sound for today and that a well laid roadmap is in place for tomorrow. Many “one-off” changes can be made directly to a deployed reconciliation (i.e. only within a single period) or permanently going forward (i.e. to the profile). The “catch” is the key properties set on a profile or reconciliation – the Account ID. The Account ID represents the granularity at which the reconciliation is being performed, such as [Business Unit]-[Account] or [Entity]-[Natural Account]-[Subaccount].

ARCS From the Ground Up 1[Screenshot 6: The Account ID is a unique identifier for the reconciliation.]

The Account ID is fundamental to the reconciliation, as indicated by the asterisks (i.e. “*”) in Screenshot 6. Changing it in any way will break the Prior Reconciliation “link” with previously completed instances of the reconciliation.

But let’s push that idea one step further – what if I want to change the key properties themselves – that is to say – change the actual Profile Segments? The Profile Segments determine the name (ex. from “Company” to “Business Unit”), number (ex. from 2 to 3 segments), and even type of values (ex. setting up the Business Unit segment to always be an integer) that are viable for use when setting up an Account ID. Therefore, if this was set up incorrectly or if the granularity at which reconciliations are performed has changed since the initial implementation, then redesigning the Profile Segments may become a requirement.

ARCS even makes this type of redesign possible, but at a cost. An administrator needs to first delete all Profiles; only then will the application allow a modification to the Profiles Segments in the Configuration card.

ARCS From the Ground Up 2[Screenshot 7a: Unable to modify the Name of Profile Segment 1 which is currently named “Company.” The field appears grayed out. This is because Profiles are currently using these Profile Segments.]

ARCS From the Ground Up 3[Screenshot 7b: After removing the Profiles, Profile Segment 1 is now able to be modified. In the example, Profile Segment is renamed to “Business Unit.”]

While Screenshots 7a & 7b show that this is possible, there are repercussions. Similar to changing the Account IDs, this change will break any links to previously completed reconciliations. Additionally, any existing mappings within outside Integration solutions such as Cloud Data Manager or FDMEE, or references to Profile Segments in customized attributes or rules may be affected. This type of redesign should only be done after carefully considering all options.

Other common questions relate to redesigning an attribute, typically the system attributes such as Process or Account Type. This is a straightforward change as it relates to updating the property on the Profiles; however, it is important to note that any reference to any existing artifact (i.e. an artifact can be a format, a custom attribute, an attribute member, etc.) within ARCS will prevent the deletion of said artifact. As an example, if the Account Type structure requires redesigning, but there is a reference to any of the members (such as in a historical period), then these members cannot be deleted without first removing the references. This can be tedious when there are multiple years of reconciliations to consider.

ARCS From the Ground Up 4

[Screenshot 8: When trying to remove the Custom Attribute named “PLACE CUSTOM ATTRIBUTE HERE,” ARCS prevents this deletion and cites which artifact is using the Custom Attribute. In this example, the Bank Reconciliation format is using this Custom Attribute – thus, it cannot be deleted.]

Unlike many system messages, ARCS actually provides useful troubleshooting information as seen in Screenshot 8. However, it still may not be worth it to you to retroactively make this change. A recommendation is to “archive” artifacts that will not be used going forward by renaming them with “Old” or “Hist,” then create a separate artifact to use going forward.

ARCS From the Ground Up 5[Screenshot 9: A work-around to deleting previously used artifacts is to rename them and then use a new artifact going forward. In this example, the suffix “- Old” is added to this Custom Attribute to indicate that it is no longer in use.]

Previous uses of the artifact such as in completed reconciliations will update to reflect the name change. In the example provided in Screenshot 9, this custom attribute for historical periods will be updated with the “– Old” suffix to indicate to ARCS administrators that it is no longer in use but was used historically.

ARCS is a flexible application solution that allows for nearly any change to be made, though the effort and complexity will vary. While sound design can prevent many issues, it should be a comfort to know that there is “wiggle room” if the requirements change in the future.

Join me in the last post of the ARCS modularity series – a real crowd pleaser: Automation in Account Reconciliation Cloud Service (ARCS): At Its Finest

*Screenshots taken from the patch 1806 release.

One thought on “Redesign in Account Reconciliation Cloud Service (ARCS): From the Ground Up

  1. Pingback: Automation in Account Reconciliation Cloud Service (ARCS): At Its Finest | Edgewater Ranzal Weblog

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