EDMCS and Data Governance – Part 1

Ahh… February. An interesting month with a variety of happenings. From the significant – Black History Month and President’s Day, to the exciting – the Super Bowl…well sometimes. From the romantic -Valentine’s Day, to the silly – that tenacious ground hog trying to find his shadow…AGAIN. Not to mention that Spring is just around the corner and brings us the glorious event known as “March Madness!”

Why am I babbling about February? <segue> Because it is also the month that introduced Data Governance and Collaborative Workflows with the release of Enterprise Data Management Cloud Service (EDMCS) v19.02. <segue>

As we continue this journey to Enterprise Performance Management (EPM) Cloud, the addition of Data Governance to EDMCS is a major step forward, especially for those of us who have worked with the classic on-premise solutions (Data Relationship Management (DRM) and Data Relationship Governance (DRG)) and who have been awaiting a similar offering in EDMCS to support our Cloud clients. From what I’ve seen so far, a major gap between DRM/DRG and EDMCS has been addressed with this release.

In this blog series, I’d like to further explore Data Governance in EDMCS. At a high level, this is how I see this series unfolding:

  • Part 1 will provide the foundation, background, and basic concepts for EDMCS and Data Governance
  • Part 2 will get more into the “techy” stuff and dive deeper into Approval Policies and Security
  • Part 3 will provide a recap and closing thoughts/lessons learned

So, with that said, onto Part 1…

Prerequisites

Before diving head first into configuring Data Governance and collaborative workflows in EDMCS, there are a few things to consider.

  • Don’t forget people and process. I’m a big believer that people and process are just as (and usually much more) important as the tool. Please refer to this blog post for a quick read on this: The Data Governance Triple Crown.

I believe the same tenets apply to EDMCS and that it’s important to start thinking about a formal data governance program that includes a charter, executive sponsorship, roles & responsibilities, metrics, and much more. Data Governance can be a challenging cultural shift for many organizations which requires strong change management to handle the inevitable resistance. This is where a formal data governance framework can help.

  • Establish the foundation. As with building a house, it’s important to lay a solid foundation before you install the wiring and plumbing. Build your EDMCS application(s) and dimensions, and populate your primary and alternate hierarchies first. Get the client comfortable with the tool and the content. Then you can start to layer in the workflows.
  • Start to identify the “who” (e.g. the people involved and the roles they will play: who will be submitting requests? Who will be approving? Who will do both?
  • Start to think about the “what.” What applications/dimensions/hierarchies will be governed? What are the use cases and typical scenarios that require data governance? Start to collaboratively mock up and storyboard some typical workflows with the client to visualize how the workflows will function. And don’t try to build a workflow for every possible scenario. Start with the big hitters and low hanging fruit first. You can always add more workflows later.

What’s Included in EDMCS Workflows?

Are you wondering what EDMCS includes as far as data governance functionality? In summary, EDMCS supports:

  • Two types of roles – submitters and approvers
  • Separation of duties – workflows can be configured to prevent submitters from approving their own requests
  • The “four eyes” principle: EDMCS data governance adheres to the principle that requests must be approved by at least two people
  • Default application views and maintenance views: workflows can work with both types of views
  • Subscriptions: workflows can be triggered by Subscription requests
  • Email-based notifications
  • Serial and Parallel approvals:
    • Serial approval means a sequential order of approvals is required. For example, Approver #2 can’t approve until Approver #1 approves, Approver #3 can’t approve until Approver #2 approves, and so on.
    • Parallel approval means the approvals can occur in any order and at the same time.
    • With either method, all approvals must occur before the request is committed.
  • Configuration of Reminder and Escalation intervals
  • Multiple Workflow Stages:
    • Submit – initiate the request and add/edit/delete line items in the request. Note that with the 19.02 release, you can also attach documents and insert comments at the line item level. These enhancements are helpful to attach policies, supporting details, and other documentation related to the workflow request.
    • Approve – similar to DRG, an approver can approve, push back, or reject a request. Pushing back will send the request back to the submitter for additional changes. Rejecting will close the request and end the workflow.
    • Commit (implied) – once the request is fully approved, it is committed, hierarchies are updated, and the request history can be viewed like any other request.
  • Approval Policies – this is really the brains of how workflows are configured in EDMCS, and the next blog post cover this in greater detail. But here is a screenshot of the Approval Policy screen showing the available options:

Kevin Black - EDMCS and Data Governance - Part 1 - 3-8-19 Image 1

Conclusion

I hope you found this blog post helpful as an introduction to EDMCS and data governance, and that you will keep reading as the rest of the series is posted. Please contact me with any questions and comments!

And don’t forget to follow me on Twitter (@kblackEPM) and check out/subscribe to my blog (along with the blogs authored by my very talented colleagues at Alithya).

https://ranzal.blog/author/kblackranzal/

https://ranzal.blog/

Interested in better understanding EDMCS, the RESTful API, and Cloud Data Management? Be sure to check these excellent blog posts by Tony Scalese, aka FDM Guru: https://ranzal.blog/author/ascalese/

Looking for an outstanding resource for all things master data-related and more? Look no further!  https://datarestless.com/

Data Governance in the Cloud: An Integrated Strategy; A Unified Solution

Are you tasked with making organizational decisions that have placed you in a major dilemma? As a decision-maker in today’s fast-paced economy, you must wonder how you can cut costs, improve the bottom line, and still maintain the data quality necessary to make strategic decisions.

Take heart because it IS possible to achieve a balance of on-premise and off-premise Enterprise Performance Management (EPM) software while maintaining integrity and control of your data to provide the quality and data assurance needed for success – AND benefit financially from new Cloud technologies.

Success is a combination of understanding what each data tract requires and creating an integration strategy consisting of the necessary business processes and software tools that deliver consistency and integrity of your EPM strategic data.

Past trends called for a tight on-premise coupling of all EPM software to achieve the best results. This strategy required maintenance of a large hardware and software infrastructure and related personnel to keep everything running smoothly.  The new Cloud “POD” subscriptions are geared toward reducing the high costs of infrastructure which is a financial benefit. As in all things in life, there is a consequence of moving to Cloud technology.   An unexpected consequence of Pod technology is the creation of isolated silos of information, but there is an easy resolution!  The key to overcoming this limitation is to gain an understanding of what each component offers and demands, and creating an integration strategy to bridge that gap.

If you are interested in learning how to create this strategy to bring the various pieces together as a unified solution or if your organization plans to migrate to the EPM Cloud platform in the future, this whitepaper helps to define a process to pre-build the integration strategy and make moving to the Cloud easier with reduced time to migrate.

Download our whitepaper: Data Relationship Management (DRM) for Cloud-Based Technologies:  Using DRM for Data Governance in the Cloud

Oracle Business Intelligence – Synchronizing Hierarchical Structures to Enable Federation

More and more Oracle customers are finding value in federating their EPM cubes with existing relational data stores such as data marts and data warehouses (for brevity, data warehouse will refer to all relational data stores). This post explains the concept of federation, explores the consequences of allowing hierarchical structures to get out of synchronization, and shares options to enable this synchronization.

In OBI, federation is the integration of distinct data sources to allow end users to perform analytical tasks without having to consider where the data is coming from. There are two types of federation to consider when using EPM and data warehouse sources:  vertical and horizontal.  Vertical federation allows users to drill down a hierarchy and switch data sources when moving from an aggregate data source to a more detailed one.  Most often, this occurs in the Time dimension whereby the EPM cube stores data for year, quarter, and month, and the relational data sources have details on daily transactions.  Horizontal federation allows users to combine different measures from the distinct data sources naturally in an OBI analysis, rather than extracting the data and building a unified report in another tool.

Federation makes it imperative that the common hierarchical structures are kept in sync. To demonstrate issues that can occur during vertical federation when the data sources are not synchronized, take the following hierarchies in an EMP application and a data warehouse:

Figure 1: Unsynchronized Hierarchies

Jason Hodson Blog Figure 1.jpg

Notice that Colorado falls under the Western region in the EPM application, but under the Southwestern region in the data warehouse. Also notice that the data warehouse contains an additional level (or granularity) in the form of cities for each region.  Assume that both data sources contain revenue data.  An OBI analysis such as this would route the query to the EPM cube and return these results:

Figure 2: EPM Analysis – Vertical Federation

Jason Hodson Blog Figure 2

However, if the user were to expand the state of Washington to see the results for each city, OBI would route the query to the data warehouse. When the results return, the user would be confronted with different revenue figures for the Southwest and West regions:

Figure 3: Data Warehouse – Vertical Federation

Jason Hodson Blog Figure 3

When the hierarchical structures are not aligned between the two data sources, irreconcilable differences can occur when switching between the sources. Many times, end users are not aware that they are switching between EPM and a data warehouse, and will simply experience a confusing reorganization in their analysis.

To demonstrate issues that occur in horizontal federation, assume the same hierarchies as in Figure 1 above, but the EPM application contains data on budget revenue while the data warehouse contains details on actual revenue. An analysis such as this could be created to query each source simultaneously and combine the budget and actual data along the common dimension:

Figure 4: Horizontal Federation

Jason Hodson Blog Figure 4

However, drilling into the West and Southwest regions will result in Colorado becoming an erroneously “shared” member:

Figure 5: Colorado as a “Shared” Member

Jason Hodson Blog Figure 5

In actuality, the mocked up analysis above would more than likely result in an error since OBI would not be able to match the hierarchical structures during query generation.

There are a number of options to enable the synchronization of hierarchical structures across EPM applications and data warehouses. Many organizations are manually maintaining their hierarchical structures in spreadsheets and text files, often located on an individual’s desktop.  It is possible to continue this manual maintenance; however, these dispersed files should be centralized, a governance processes defined, and the EPM metadata management and data warehouse ETL process redesigned to pick up these centralized files.  This method is still subject to errors and is inherently difficult to properly govern and audit.  For organizations that are already using Enterprise Performance Management Architect (EPMA), a scripting process can be implemented that extracts the hierarchical structures in flat files.  A follow on ETL process to move these hierarchies into the data warehouse will also have to be implemented.

The best practices solution is to use Hyperion Data Relationship Management (DRM) to manage these hierarchical structures. DRM boasts robust metadata management capabilities coupled with a system-agnostic approach to exporting this metadata.  DRM’s most valuable export method allows pushing directly to a relational database.  If a data warehouse is built in tandem with an EPM application, DRM can push directly to a dimensional table that can then be accessed by OBI.  If there is a data warehouse already in place, existing ETL processes may have to be modified or a dimensional table devoted to the dimension hierarchy created.  Ranzal has a DRM accelerator package to enable the synchronization of hierarchical structures between EPM and data warehouses that is designed to work with our existing EPM application DRM implementation accelerators.  Using these accelerators, Ranzal can perform an implementation in as little as six weeks that provides metadata management for the EPM application, establishes a process for maintaining hierarchical structure synchronization between EPM and the data warehouse, and federation of the data source.

While the federation of EPM and data warehouse sources has been the primary focus, it is worth noting that two EPM cubes or two data warehouses could be federated in OBI. For many of the reasons discussed previously, data synchronization processes will have to be in place to enable this federation.  The previous solutions for maintaining metadata synchronization may be able to be adapted to enable this federation.

The federation of EPM and data warehouse sources allows an enterprise to create a more tightly integrated analytical solution. This tight integration allows users to transverse the organization’s data, gain insight, and answer business essential questions at the speed of thought.  As demonstrated, mismanaging hierarchical structures can result in an analytical solution that produces unexpected results that can harm user confidence.  Enterprise solutions often need enterprise approaches to governance; therefore, it is often imperative to understand and address shortcomings in hierarchical structure management.  Ranzal has a deep knowledge of EPM, DRM, and OBIEE, and how these systems can be implemented to tightly work together to address an organization’s analytical and reporting needs.

Come See Edgewater Ranzal at Kscope11

ODTUG Kscope11 is right around the corner. Kscope11 offers the chance for a full day EPM Symposium on Sunday, plus the opportunity to learn from experts in the EPM and BI fields on a wide range of topics.

Edgewater Ranzal will be well represented at the conference, with our associates presenting eight presentations covering Planning, DRM, EPMA, HFM, and FDM. The sessions that we will be presenting at Kscope11 are summarized below. Each title links to an abstract for the presentation, providing additional details.

Session No. Date Time Room Presenter Title
1 6/27/11 11:15 – 12:15 102C Jeff Richardson Calculation Manager:  The New and Improved Application to Create Planning Business Rules
7 6/28/11 11:15 – 12:15 103C Tony Scalese Planning (or Essbase) and FDM and ERPi Equals Success!
10 6/28/11 4:30 – 5:30 101B Chris Barbieri Security and Auditing in HFM
11 6/29/11 8:30 – 9:30 103A Patrick Lehner Best Practices for Using DRM with EPMA
11 6/29/11 8:30 – 9:30 101B Chris Barbieri Getting Started with Calc Manager for HFM
12 6/29/11 9:45 – 10:45 101B Chris Barbieri Advanced Topics in Calc Manager for HFM
12 6/29/11 9:45 – 10:45 102C John Martin Have it Your Way: Building Planning Hierarchies with EPMA or Outline Load Utility
13 6/29/11 11:15 – 12:15 101B Tony Scalese Maximizing the Value of an EPM Investment with ERPi, FDM, & EPMA
17 6/30/11 8:30 – 9:30 101B Tony Scalese Taking Your FDM Application to the Next Level with Advanced Scripting
18 6/30/11 10:30 – 11:30 101B Peter Fugere IFRS Reporting Within Hyperion Financial Management

In addition to the presentations above, you can catch up with our experts at our booth in the Vendor Showcase.

We look forward to seeing you in Long Beach. If you haven’t already registered, you can do so here.