Demystify the Balance Dimension in Profitability and Cost Management

Management Ledger models, whether Hyperion Profitability and Cost Management (HPCM) or Profitability and Cost Management Cloud Service (PCMCS), have been around for a few years, but I still receive emails asking for help with figuring out where the results are coming from. This request is often related to a lack of understanding of the Balance dimension. Here are some key pieces of information regarding this system dimension, how it works, how it should be used when defining allocations and integration jobs, and how to leverage it to troubleshoot your allocations.

Before we have a look at each member within this dimension, let’s go over some basic rules that govern the creation of an HPCM or PCMCS Management Ledger (ML) application:

  1. All HPCM or PCMCS ML applications must contain just one dimension named Balance
  2. Members and their properties cannot be edited or removed.
  3. You don’t need to import a file in order to load/setup the Balance dimension; members are created automatically when deploying an application for the first time.
  4. You can choose to rename the Balance dimension (translate it into another language, for example) when you first set up the application in PCMCS.

For the most part, the Balance dimension members are quite easy to follow and understand, but familiarity with usage guidelines helps to avoid issues during development and supports troubleshooting.

Demystifying the Balance Dimension in PCM - Image 1

  • Input — Used to store data input/pre-allocated data sets, whether these are pool or driver data sets. Data is generally loaded against this member in combination with the NoRule member. Input can be populated through custom calculations, but it is generally advised to keep it dedicated to valid data loads/input rather than for storing calculated or allocated results.
  • Adjustment In —Adjustment In can be used for manual adjustments to the Input data prior to running allocations. In this case, the Adjustment In data will be loaded against the NoRule member. Any manually submitted data on the Adjustment member against a Rule ID member may be eliminated during the subsequent data loads and calculations. Adjustment In can also be used during custom calculations to store intermediary values or calculated driver data.
  • Adjustment Out —Same usage as for Adjustment In, but with a negative data value.
  • Allocation In — This member will be populated against the Destination or Target intersection for the allocation rule.
  • Allocation Out —This member will be populated against the Source intersection of the allocation rule and the corresponding Rule ID member, or against a predefined “Offset” intersection that is custom defined for a given rule.
  • Allocation Offset Amount — Displays an amount that further reduces an Allocation In member, if one was used in addition to the Allocation Out. I have provided an example of how this member is populated and used in a lower section of this post.
  • Net Change — represents the total change for a given intersection, regardless of alternate offset actions.
  • Net Balance – sum of Input (initial data loaded) and any Net Changes made to the same intersection.
  • Remainder — Displays the difference between Allocation In and Allocation Out plus Allocation Offset Amount, if any.
  • Balance — The amount resulting when adjustments, allocations, and offsets are considered.

Rules assign funds to destinations based on the way you have defined the allocation logic (member selections, sequencing, concurrency, etc.). “Allocations in” and “allocations out” are being generated upon executing the calculations of the Profitability model. Each pair of adjustments and allocations (the “in” and the “out”) should result in a zero sum in order to balance the transaction. The Input member is affected by each adjustment and allocation. The difference between what was taken from Input and what remains at the end of an allocation will be accounted for in the Remainder.

The Remainder member is the source of your allocations, not the Net Balance member, as most would think.  Remainder takes into consideration alternate offsets and ensures we do not perform a double booking or a double allocation of the same data source, regardless of where the offset was applied.

To further explain the Balance dimension usage, I have used an example from the Bikes default application BksML30, which can be deployed into PCMCS through a few clicks.

The original application had only one adjustment Rule populating the Adjustment In member. I have copied that rule and reused it to demonstrate the same usage for the Adjustment Out member. Remember the adjustment out aggregation operator is still +, so if you want to offset data sets, you must use the appropriate signage for your data; in other words, negate the result either via a multiplication with -1 or by simply adding a – to the formula.

The new ruleset contents will look like this:

Demystifying the Balance Dimension in PCM - Image 2

Our initial data set is loaded on the Input/No Rule combination for the two accounts – Rent and Utilities – on the intersection with Corporate Entity.

The data adjustments are stored against Adjustment In and Adjustment Out.

Demystifying the Balance Dimension in PCM - Image 3

In order to further illustrate how to correctly follow the allocation process, I split the original Reassignment rule into 2 rules, each dedicated to its own account. I also updated the metadata by adding two new Account siblings to Rent and Utilities as offsets for each account.

Alternate offsets are simply intersections of members where you would like to store the offset data point, if it should differ from the source of the allocation.

The Remainder member demonstration is connected to the usage of alternate offsets, and before we go into the details of the numerical example, I would like to list out a few rules for setting up alternate offsets:

  • Alternate offsets are available for selection only in standard allocation rules. For Custom calculations, your Offset custom calc would have to be pointed to the appropriate “alternate” target.
  • All dimensions, including the ones predefined in the rule context, are repeated in the Offset screen as soon as you select “Alternate Offset Location.” You must select a single base level member for at least one dimension.
  • There is no “Same As Source” (SAS) option for offsets. The dimensions that must be offset on the Source intersections can be left blank in the Offset screen selections.
  • If each source member selection has its own offset, you will have to split the rule up into as many granular rules as needed in order to cover the individual offset selection. For example, if you have 6 accounts, each with its own offset account equivalent, you will have to create 6 standard allocation rules to create the individual offset selection for each account.

Going back to the numerical example and the usage of the Offset tab, in the update rule I have selected the below member intersections:

Demystifying the Balance Dimension in PCM - Image 4

The Source account was Rent, target is “Same as Source” (SAS), and the alternate offset account is FACOffset_Rent.

After the rules are executed, we will see the results below; focus on the Allocation Offset Amount member and the Allocation Out Member.

Even though the offset was applied to an alternate account for both Rent and Utilities, the allocation engine correctly identifies the Remainder of these two accounts as being 0.

  1. The first step behind the scenes is for the allocation to correctly distribute the data to the target intersections.
  2. The second step is to perform the offset on the intersection specified by the user, if different from the source intersection.
  3. The third step is to copy the Allocation Out value onto the Source Intersection members, on allocation Offset Amount member. This final step is performed via a custom calculation embedded in the PCMCS generated scripts which ensures there will be no double counting of pool data.

So even though we “moved” data from the Rent account, Corporate Entity, to other Entities, on the same target Account, the offset was performed on an alternate member. This allows us to create a report with Rent (Input), Rent (Allocation In) and FACOffset_Rent (Allocation out).

This is not a typical example of how alternate offsets are used from a functional standpoint, but it helps explain the mechanics behind the scenes. This alternate offset option is mostly used in cases where a Bill Out account and a Chargeback account will differ and allows users to trace which portion of a chargeback account is coming from different source accounts.

The final goal of an allocation is to generate a Remainder member with a value of 0. This ensures the total allocation of a pool data set, whether this was loaded or received from prior allocation steps. If the Remainder member has a positive value, then it is indicating that you have not fully utilized your pool data. If the Remainder member has a negative value, then you have overutilized your pool data which may be, in some cases, intentional.

Demystifying the Balance Dimension in PCM - Image 5

In situations where you will not give access to the PCMCS ML application to users who need to understand the various components of a data point flowing through the allocation steps, due to licensing costs or other considerations, the usage of alternate offsets throughout your allocation flow might be helpful.

When talking about reporting out of PCMCS ML, our clients always emphasize simplicity, and we often get requests to remove the Rule and Balance dimensions from final reporting solutions, to cancel the noise and give finance users solely the core information. In such situations, the usage of alternate offsets has proved beneficial as these finance users can still follow the flow and components of a cost without having to deal with the rule by rule detail. If further investigation is necessary, this can be pursued within the PCMCS ML model itself rather than in the external reporting solution.

If you need further help with figuring out the purpose and usage of the Balance dimension within PCMCS, email us at infosolutions@alithya.com. Our PCM Center of Excellence team is ready to share leading practices and industry-specific solutions that accelerate your ROI and expand the capabilities of your chosen profitability software.

Worry No More! Say Goodbye to Pain and Frustration when Submitting Service or Enhancement Requests with Oracle for PCMCS

While nobody likes submitting Service Requests (SR) on the Oracle support site, this is a necessary task that we must get comfortable with, whether our applications are on-premise or in the Cloud.  After 12 years of consulting, I can say that I have seen or pursued many wrong ways of submitting an SR which, in turn, yields results along similar lines – a lot of back-and-forth emailing with Oracle’s support staff, personal frustration, misinformation, and most importantly – time wasted on all sides.

Worry no more!  Here is a list of things you can do to avoid further pain and frustration when submitting Service Requests or Enhancement Requests with Oracle for Profitability and Cost Management Cloud Service (PCMCS).

  1. Where do I start when submitting SRs and ERs for PCMCS?

You can still use the generic Oracle Support website to open either an SR or an Enhancement Request (ER) with Oracle for Cloud applications, but the right way to do this is to first gain access to the Oracle Cloud Support website which looks slightly different and has a couple of new fields to complete. The email associated with the Oracle account should be the same email that has access to specific Cloud subscriptions.

Standard Oracle Support website

PCMCS Image 1

Cloud Support website

PCMCS Image 2

  1. Provide feedback

Login in to the Cloud application for which you want to create the SR or ER, and once you are logged in to PCMCS, navigate to your user name (top right) and select “Provide Feedback.” A new screen will appear enabling you to highlight the area of concern to provide context for the reason you are submitting the SR or ER.

Provide details around the area of concern. This gives context to the issue at hand and creates a reference for future troubleshooting. For example, if the issue is related to one specific Rule, ensure that the last screen open before you click on Provide Feedback is on the rule itself, or open to the job library listing the execution of the rule. You will only be able to highlight areas on the last screen open before launching the “Provide Feedback” screen.  The details you provide here will not automatically be copied into your SR. If you want to describe the issue in detail within this section, you can copy the same text within the SR itself – save it locally before submitting the feedback.

  1. Options for your feedback.

After you submit your feedback, a new panel will come up and will contain the following 3 sections:

  1. Environment: a listing of your Browser, Platform, Version, Locale, Resolution, Time zone, Cookies enabled (Y/N), URL of the instance, and the User Agent. You do not have to fill in anything in this section. All information is filled in for you.
  2. Plugins: a listing of enabled plugins, if any. You do not have to fill in anything in this section. All information is filled in for you.
  3. Confirm Application snapshot submission: this is the only section where you must provide input.

PCMCS Image 5You have a choice of Yes / No – depending on how comfortable you feel about Oracle using your daily maintenance snapshot for regression testing in upcoming releases. Giving Oracle access to your maintenance snapshots means you are agreeing to them using the model and any related data for their testing going forward. If your hierarchy structures and data are not sensitive, then you may choose to select “Yes.”  My personal preference is to select “No” and provide the static/current moment in time archived snapshot within the SR . When the SR is closed, the contents of said snapshot will be archived and not used for further regression testing.

  1. Generate a Diagnostic Report (UDR) ID

When clicking the “Submit” button on this screen, a unique alphanumeric reference is generated. This reference will be required when submitting an SR or ER on the Oracle Cloud Support website. Write down or, preferably, copy and save this UDR string of characters on your workstation in a txt file.

  1. Log in to the Oracle Cloud Support website and proceed with opening a new Cloud SR/ER.

Select the “Create Service Request” button on the lower left-hand side of your screen.

PCMCS Image 6

Select “Service Type” from the drop-down list of available Cloud services to which your user has access.

PCMCS Image 7

Once you have selected “Oracle Hyperion Profitability and Cost Management Cloud Service,” a listing of all available instances will be displayed in the new “Service Name” section:

PCMCS Image 8

Make sure you select the appropriate “Service Name” with the instance where you generated the related UDR (see previous steps).

Add “Problem Type” and select based on the type closest to your issue:

PCMCS Image 9

The above choices will not trigger related content or a list of options – this is merely to ensure that the ticket goes to the appropriate team during the investigation process.

In the “Problem Summary” section, reference the Cloud product for which you are creating the SR or ER. This will be the subject of your ticket, and it will help administer and keep track of multiple tickets at the same time.

  1. Attach all System Reports available for your PCMCS app.

To avoid multiple back and forth email exchanges with the Oracle Support staff, provide them with all the available information. Here is a current list of all available reports for troubleshooting PCMCS applications.

  1. Execution statistics for the last model / allocation execution connected to the SR – if SR is related to calc performance, calc troubleshooting or rule setup. (PDF or XLS format preferable)
  2. Program Documentation (with details; not with aliases) (XLS or PDF format preferable)
  3. Dimension Statistics (PDF format preferable)
  4. POV Statistics (PDF or XLS format preferable)

All these reports can be generated from PCMCS – Navigator menu – System reports.

PCMCS Image 10

  1. Attach the Diagnostic report

From the “Navigator” Menu, select “Application,” click on the drop-down in “Actions” and select “Export Supplemental Diagnostics.” This report is very useful to the development team troubleshooting your issue.

PCMCS Image 11

When selecting this report, a new job will be launched that can take anywhere between a couple of minutes to 20+ minutes, depending on the size of your application and the amount of logging involved.

An archive of the diagnostics reports will be generated in the File Explorer within the Application menu.  Some of the reports in this archive will be a repeat of the other reports mentioned in the previous step, but if you provide all this information simultaneously, the redundancy should not cause any issues. If you are not open to launching such process in your environment during business hours, and yet you still want to submit the SR in a timely fashion, you can skip this step and provide this report only upon request from Oracle Support staff.

  1. Error description

If you can replicate the error, capture each step via screenshots and save them in a Word doc. The earlier the support staff understands what you are dealing with, the faster the entire troubleshooting process will be completed.

Refer to menu options precisely as what they are called within PCMCS.

For example, to submit an SR or ER related to the Calculation Rules menu, refer to it as Calculation Rules – Rules Express Editing, as both names appear in the PCMCS menu.

PCMCS Image 12

  1. Establish the SR level appropriately.

There are 4 options to choose from, and you should choose based on urgency as well as level of importance.

PCMCS Image 13

Choose severity 1 and 2 only when applicable. You may be inclined to select such severity options so that your issue is resolved quickly, but use your own criteria to distinguish between something that is really a show stopper and something that is not. Time is of the essence for both you and the Oracle Development team.

When choosing severity 1, you will open your calendar for potential phone calls that can occur at any time, regardless of your time zone.

  1. My request is really an ER, not an SR.

If your SR is an Enhancement Request, provide a lot of supporting detail in the “Business Justification” section. Not doing so will delay the Enhancement Request submission by up to 2 weeks. If further business justification is requested, respond promptly to make things move along and ensure that your request makes it to the next patch release sooner rather than later.

Once an Enhancement Request is recorded, your SR will be updated with the ER ID (which will differ from the SR ID originally assigned the moment you submitted the ticket).  The original SR will be closed, and you can open a new SR quoting the ER ID 48 hours after the moment your request was accepted. The Support staff will confirm whether the ER will make it in the next monthly patch release.

  1. Bedside manners for SR/ER submitters.

Try to reduce the number of communications within the SR. Taking the above steps will get you closer to achieving a near-perfect SR submission. Be mindful about how to communicate efficiently. The higher the amount of back-and-forth communication, the more difficult it will be for the development team to follow the conversation trail and ensure efficient troubleshooting.

Whether you are a service provider or a PCMCS administrator who inherited an application at the end of a project implementation, we all tap the same Oracle Support resources which are, as are most things, finite. The more efficient your SR/ER submission is, the faster these resources provide a response with accurate and detailed troubleshooting steps. For any time-sensitive issues or further escalation, leverage your Oracle representative and your implementation partner. Their existing relationship with Oracle Product Management will help direct your query to the right resources and ensure your SR is not stuck because of lack of clarity regarding which team should own it. This will ensure that your SR/ER is fast-tracked to the appropriate team and given the right level of attention. For any critical issues you encounter with PCMCS or other Cloud subscriptions where there is no solution in sight, reach out to Alithya at infosolutions@alithya.com so that our team can provide a fast end effective assessment.

Using Subscriptions with EDMCS

As an earlier blog mentioned, the 18.07 release of Enterprise Data Management Cloud Service (EDMCS) delivered one eagerly anticipated piece of functionality: Subscriptions! And do not fear – these subscriptions are useful and do not involve a 1-year subscription to the Fruit of the Month Club (not that there’s anything wrong with that).

This blog post dives deeper into this new functionality, describes how it works, and highlights some lessons learned from utilizing Subscriptions with a current project involving multiple EDMCS Custom applications supporting multiple Profitability and Cost Management Cloud Service (PCMCS) applications.

Why Are Subscriptions Important?

Subscriptions are a huge step towards true “mastering” of enterprise data assets within a single master data Cloud platform. With EDMCS, it is important to build deployment-specific applications configured to the dimensionality requirements of the target applications to most effectively use the packaged adapters, validations, and integration capabilities. But in many cases, you also need to share common hierarchies across applications and avoid duplicative (that’s my big word for today) maintenance. After all, why have a master data management tool if you still must perform maintenance in multiple places? That’s just silly.

The answer to this dilemma is Subscriptions. By implementing Subscriptions, requests submitted to a primary viewpoint will automatically generate parallel subscription requests to subscribing viewpoints to automatically synchronize your hierarchy changes across EDMCS applications.

Note

This comment is important: “automatically generate parallel subscription requests.” EDMCS will not update a target, or subscribing, viewpoint behind the scenes with no visibility or audit trail to what has occurred. A parallel Subscription request will be generated along with the Interactive request that will be visible in the Requests window, along with the full audit trail and details that you find in an Interactive request. Even better, the Subscription request will generate an email and attach a Request File of the changes.

Nerdy Details

Views and Viewpoints

The first thing to really think about is the View and Viewpoint design of your EDMCS applications. Subscriptions are defined at the Viewpoint level, so you need to identify the source and target viewpoint for your business situation. With my current project, I have multiple EDMCS applications supporting multiple PCMCS applications. While the dimensionality is similar across the applications, the hierarchies vary, especially with the alternate hierarchies. So, it has been important to isolate the “common” or shared structures that should be synchronized across applications into their own viewpoint so that a subscription mechanism can be created.

Node Type Converters

You will likely need to create a node type converter. If the source and target viewpoints do not share a common node type, you must create a node type converter for subscriptions to work. In my situation, I had already created node type converters since I wanted to compare common structures across EDMCS applications, so the foundation was there to readily implement subscriptions.

Permissions

To create a Subscription, the creator must have (at a minimum) View Browser permission to the source view, View Owner permission to the target view, and Data Manager permission to the target application.

The Subscription assignee (this is the user who will “submit” the subscription request) must have (at a minimum) View Browser permission to the source view and Data Manager permission to the target application.

Creating a Subscription

Once the foundation is in place in terms of viewpoints, node type converters, and permissions, the actual creation of a subscription is easy.

Inspect the target viewpoint (the viewpoint that is to receive the changes from a source viewpoint via subscription), navigate to the Subscriptions tab, and click Edit. From there you can select the source viewpoint, the request assignee, and enable Auto Submit if needed. Save the subscription and you are all set.

  • Currently, there is no capability to edit an existing subscription. You must delete and add a new subscription to effect a change.
  • Any validation errors for your subscription will appear on this dialog as well. These are documented nicely in the Oracle EDMCS administration guide.

Using Subscriptions with EDMCS Image 1

Auto-Submit and Email Notifications

Emails will be generated and sent to the Request Assignee, whether Auto-Submit is enabled or not. The email will include details such as the original request #, the subscription request #, and how many request items were processed or skipped.

Using Subscriptions with EDMCS Image 2

Note

  • Remember, the subscription request will have a Request File attached to it. View the request file attachment to see details on why specific request items were skipped.
  • The request file is not attached to the email itself, only to the request in EDMCS.

Lessons Learned

Like I mentioned earlier, the foundation is important to making subscriptions work. And it all boils down to design and ensuring the building blocks of that foundation are in place:

Design, Design, Design!

  • The importance of dimension, view, and viewpoint design cannot be overstated. For each dimension, evaluate the primary and alternate hierarchy content and identify what will be shared across dimensions or applications and what will be unique to each dimension and application.
  • Based on that analysis, carefully design your viewpoints to enable subscriptions across EDMCS applications for hierarchies that truly need “mastering.”
  • As early as possible, identify the EDMCS user population along with permission levels for applications and views. This is important to identify the appropriate “Request Assignee” for your Subscriptions. I recommend creating a security matrix identifying each user and the permissions each will have.
  • Without a clear and well thought out design, you will find yourself constantly re-doing your views and viewpoints which, in turn, will cause constant rework of your subscriptions. The “measure twice, cut once” adage certainly applies here!
  • I am a big proponent of standard, consistent naming conventions to improve the usability and end user experience. The same holds true for Subscriptions. Consider using a standard naming convention for your viewpoints so it is clear which viewpoints have a subscription. It’s not obvious – unless you Inspect the viewpoint – that a subscription exists.
    • One approach I’ve been using is to name my source and target viewpoints identically with a special tag or symbol at the end of the target viewpoint name to indicate a subscription is present. I’m sure there are other and probably better ideas, but I find the visual cue to be helpful.
    • Perhaps in the future, Oracle will display subscription details when you hover over a viewpoint name (hint hint).

Node Type Converters

  • Ensure you have node converters in place
  • Make sure your node type converters are mapping all required properties.
    • I ran into an issue where updates to one property in my source viewpoint were not being applied to my target viewpoint via subscription requests, but all other property updates worked fine. The reason? I had recently modified my App Registration and added this property to a dimension’s node type. But my node type converter had already been created and wasn’t mapping or recognizing the new property. Once I updated my node type converter, the problem was solved.

Troubleshooting

  • The request files attached to subscription requests are a valuable troubleshooting tool. Status codes and error messages are included in these Excel files that are extremely helpful to determine why your request was not auto-submitted.
  • Inspect the Subscriptions on your viewpoints. Any validation issues will be displayed and are easily addressed. Typical Subscription validation errors include:
    • The request assignee no longer has the correct permission levels
    • The viewpoint no longer is active
    • A node type converter is missing

Conclusion

I have been looking forward to the subscription functionality in EDMCS and am pleased with it so far. Subscriptions are easy to configure, can be configured to auto-submit if desired, and generate emails to remind the requester a request has occurred and to act if the request was not submitted or request items were skipped. EDMCS Subscriptions are a big step forward to enabling true mastering of your enterprise data management assets!

Retro Reboot #1: Set It & Forget It – Scheduling FDMEE Tasks

As with most nostalgic items, reboots are the next best thing. From video game consoles to television shows, they are all getting a modern facelift and a new prime-time seat on television.  I have jumped on that band-wagon to revitalize a previous post authored by Tony Scalese: Set it & Forget It – Scheduling FDM Tasks.

As with most reboots, there must be flair and alluring content to capture old and new audiences. Since Oracle Financial Data Quality Management Enterprise Edition (FDMEE) has been in the Enterprise Performance Management (EPM) space for a while and has moved into the Cloud, this is a great time for its reboot!

Oh Great…A Reboot. Now What?

Scheduling tasks in FDMEE has never been easier. Oracle provides several ways to do this for a variety of out-of-the-box activities.  Is there a report that you want to run and email every hour?  Or how about a script that needs to run hourly?  Or maybe batch-automation every 15 minutes?  No worries!  FDMEE can handle all of that with out-of-the-box functionality.

Let us pause for a moment and determine what is needed to make this happen:

  1. Is there a business case and justification for what is about to be scheduled?
  2. Who benefits and how will they be notified of the results?
  3. Is there a defined frequency for which the activity must take place?

Getting Started

First, understand that the scheduling for FDMEE is built directly into the Graphical User Interface (GUI) anywhere you see the “SCHEDULE” button. Unlike the previous FDM counterpart which had it as an independent utility to be installed/configured, the ease of having it via the Web has removed some complexity.

A word of caution:  while this screen allows items to be scheduled, there isn’t a screen that shows “what has been” scheduled.  To do that, access to the Oracle Data Integrator (ODI) is needed, but more on this later.

Initially, the screen shows the types of schedules that can be created and their relevant inputs.

Retro Reboot Screen Shot 1

Below is a reference guide to outline FDMEE’s scheduling capabilities.

Schedule Type Inputs Notes / Examples
Simple TimeZone, Date, HH:MM:SS, AM/PM Single run based on the specified inputs.

 

Example:  Run 08/02/2018 @ 11AM

Hourly TimeZone, MM:SS Repeatable run at the specified time MM:SS time.

 

Example:  Run every hour, at the 22minute mark.

Daily TimeZone, HH:MM:SS, AM/PM Every day at the specified time.

 

Example:  Run every day at 11AM.

Weekly TimeZone, Day of the Week, HH:MM:SS, AM/PM Every specified day at the specified time.

 

Example: Run every Monday thru  Friday at  11AM.

Monthly
(day of month)
TimeZone, Date, HH:MM:SS, AM/PM Specified day at the specified time.

 

Example: Run on the 2nd day of every month at 11AM.

Monthly
(week day)
TimeZone, Iteration, Weekday, HH:MM:SS, AM/PM Specified interval and week day at the specified time.

 

Example: Run every third Tuesday at 11AM.

Why Does the Job Run Under My UserID?

That is because the system assigns the user’s credentials who created the schedule. What can go wrong with that, right?!  Well, if a user no longer exists or a password is changed, the existing jobs will no longer run.

The following considerations should be observed:

  1. Dedicate a service account that is not being used by an employee to be used for server/automation actions.
  2. This account can be a “native” user; since the account is only used internally for EPM products, having a domain account is not needed.
  3. Non-expiry passwords are best.

 It is Scheduled…Now What?

After the item is scheduled, what really happens? The action executes at the scheduled time!  Actions can easily be monitored via the FDMEE Process Details screen.  Now all the possibilities of scheduling the following can be explored:

  1. Data Load Rules
  2. Script Executions
  3. Batch Executions
  4. Report Executions

Also, as mentioned earlier, there is no way to see the batches inside of FDMEE. For that, information can be retrieved in a few ways.  The easiest way to see what is scheduled is to use the ODI Studio.

The ODI Studio provides details as seen in the screen shot below:

Retro Reboot Screen Shot 2

Any scheduled tasks will be listed under “All Schedules.” Simply double click them to obtain details related to that task.

Retro Reboot Screen Shot 3

Another effective option is to write a custom report that displays the information. My previous blog post, Easy Value with FDMEE Reports, provides further details of FDMEE report options and their value.  This would allow a report to be executed to provide a user-friendly report.

Seriously … What Now?

By now, you may have noticed from the previous blog post Scheduling FDM Tasks – A Second Option by Tony Scalese that the upsShell process is quite handy.  It allows other tools to control the FDM jobs…maybe through a corporate scheduler.  Now that most organizations have a corporate scheduler, the new FDMEE options below must be learned:

Command Purpose
Executescript.bat / .sh Executes an FDMEE Custom Script
Importmapping.bat / .sh Executes an import from text-file for Maps
Loaddata.bat / .sh Executes a Data Load Rule
Loadhrdata.bat / .sh Executes an HR Data Load Rule
Loadmetadata.bat / .sh Executes a Metadata Load Rule
Runbatch.bat / .sh Executes a defined Batch
Runreport.bat / .sh Executes a defined Report

*All files are stored in the EPM_ORACLE_HOME\products\FinancialDataQuality\bin\

In the example below, the command, when launched, executes a Data Load Rule for Jan-2012 thru Mar-2012:

Retro Reboot Screen Shot 4

There still must be a better solution…right? Things to overcome:

  1. What happens if the scheduler is Windows-based and the server is Linux?
  2. How does a separate scheduling server communicate with EPM? Does it have to be installed on each EPM Server?
  3. How can we monitor and get details of a job once it is kicked off?

What Happens if You Don’t Want to Run the .BAT/.SH Files?

You’re in luck! With the introduction of new functionality to FDMEE, RESTful APIs are also now available.  With the RESTful APIs, not only can you execute a job, but you can also loop and monitor for the results.  This enhances the previous .BAT/.SH file routines and provides a cleaner and more elegant solution.

Command Purpose
Running Data Rules Execute a Data Load Rule
Running Batch Rules Execute a Batch Definition
Import Data Mapping Import Maps
Export Data Mapping Export Maps
Execute Reports Execute a Report

*URL construct: https://<SERVICE_NAME>/aif/rest/V1

The below example is just querying for a process:

Retro Reboot Screen Shot 5

The Future…

As Oracle moves forward to enhance the RESTful APIs, many doors continue to open for FDMEE and tool scheduling. At Edgewater Ranzal, we fully embrace the RESTful concept and evolve our solutions to utilize this functionality.  The result is improved support and flexibility of FDMEE and the future of Oracle Cloud products.

Contact us at info@ranzal.com with questions about this product or its capabilities.

The Oracle Profitability and Cost Management Solution: An Introduction and Differentiators

What is Oracle Profitability and Cost Management?

Organizations with world class finance operations generally can close in a minimal number of days (2-3 in an ideal organization) and have frequent and efficient budget and forecast cycles while also visiting different ‘what if’ scenario analysis along the way. These organizations often deliver in-depth profitability and cost management analysis reports at fund, project, product, and/or customer level, completing the picture of an accurate close cycle.

Oracle offers packaged options in support of all these finance processes, but the focus of this post will be Profitability and Cost Management (PCM).

One of the most painful and time-consuming processes for any business entity is PCM analysis. The reasons why cost allocations processes are time consuming are too many to count – from model complexity to data granularity, driver metric availability, rigidity of allocation rules, delays with implementing allocation changes, and almost impossible-to-justify results. Instead of focusing on the negative aspect, let’s focus on what can be done to alleviate such pain and energize the cost accounting department by giving it access to meaningful and accurate data and empowering users through flexibility to perform virtually unlimited “what if” analysis.

The PCM Journey

The initial Profitability and Cost Management product, like almost all Oracle EPM offerings, was released on-premise in July 2008 and is known as Oracle Hyperion Profitability and Cost Management (HPCM). 10 years later, HPCM continues to deliver an easier way to design, maintain, and enhance allocation processes with little to no IT involvement as it has since it was initially launched, but with a greater focus on flexibility and transparency. The intent for HPCM was to be a user-driven application where finance teams would be involved beginning with the definition of the methodology all the way to the steps needed to execute day-to-day processing. Any cost or revenue allocation methodology is supported via HPCM while graphical traceability and allocation balancing reports support any query from top-level analysis all the way down to the most granular detail available in the application.

There are 3 HPCM modules available on-premise today. Each was designed and developed for a different type of allocation methodology or complexity need:

  1. Simple allocations – Detailed Profitability (a.k.a. single-step allocations. Example: From Accounts and Departments, allocate data to same Accounts, new target Departments, and to granular Products/SKU based on driver metric data. This module allows for a very high degree of granularity with dimensions >100k members, but it does not cater to complex driver calculations or to allocations requiring more than 1 stage).
  2. Average to high complexity allocations – Standard Profitability (a.k.a. multi-step allocations of up to 9 iterations/stages, allowing for reciprocal allocations. Example: Allocations from accounts and departments to channels, funds, and other departments. Allocation of results from previous steps are redistributed onto Products, Customers etc. Driver metric complexity is achievable with this module; custom generated drivers are available as well, but there are limitations regarding driver data granularity, granularity of allocated data, and overall hierarchy sizing).
  3. High complexity allocations – Management Ledger (unlimited number of steps, high number of complex drivers, custom driver calculations, custom allocations, more granularity, and increased flexibility in terms of defining and expanding allocation methodology). This is the last module added to the HPCM family and the only one available as SaaS Cloud Offering.

The Cloud is Your Oyster

In 2016, Oracle introduced the Cloud version of HPCM: Profitability and Cost Management Cloud Service (PCMCS).  PCMCS is a Software as a Service (SaaS) offering, and as with many of Oracle’s Cloud offerings, PCMCS includes key improvements that are not available in the on-premise version, and enhancements are made at a much faster pace.

There is currently no indication that the two HPCM modules – Detailed and Standard Profitability – will make their way to the Cloud, since increased allocation complexity as well as increased hierarchy sizing supported by the Management Ledger module caters to most, if not all, potential requirements.

The Management Ledger module included with the PCMCS SaaS subscription has a core strength in the ease of use and flexibility to change, enabling finance users to define and update allocation rules and methodologies via a point-and-click interface. While the initial setup is advisable to be performed with support from an experienced service provider, the maintenance and expansion of PCMCS (Management Ledger) models can be achieved by leveraging solely functional resources, in most cases. “What-if” scenario creation and analysis has never been easier. Users not only can copy data and allocation methodologies between scenarios, but they can also update the data sets and allocation steps independently from a standard scenario, generating as many simulation models as they need, gaining increased insight into decision making.

Standard Profitability models perform allocations in Block Storage Databases (BSO). While BSO applications are great for complex calculations and reciprocal allocation methodologies, they have the disadvantage of being limited in terms of structure or hierarchy sizing. This hierarchy restriction is not as pressing in Aggregate Storage Option (ASO) type applications, which is the technology used by Management Ledger. The design considerations for a Standard Profitability model are also significantly more rigid when compared with the Management Ledger module, which has no limitations regarding allocation stages, allocation sequencing, or a maximum number of dimensions per each allocation step.

Detailed Profitability models heavily leverage a database repository while any connected Essbase applications are used solely for reporting purposes. Initial setup and future changes, outside of the realm of simply adding new hierarchy members, will require specialized database management skills, and the usage of a single step allocation model is not as pervasive. Complex allocation methodologies may require the usage of Detailed Profitability models in conjunction with Management Ledger, but these situations represent the exception rather than the rule.

Why Should You Choose Oracle Profitability and Cost Management?

One of the key strengths for HPCM, available since it was released, and now included in PCMCS, is transparency – the ability to identify and explain any value resulting from the allocation process, with minimal effort. Each allocation rule or allocation step is uniquely identified, enabling users to easily navigate via the embedded/out-of-the-box balancing report to the desired member intersection opened through a point and click action in Excel (using Smart View) for further analysis and investigation. The out-of-the-box-program documentation reports identify the setup of each rule and can be leveraged for quick search by account, department, segment code, or any other dimension available in the application. The execution statistics reports delivered as part of the PCMCS offering enable users to quickly understand which allocation process is taking longer than expected and identify opportunities for overall process improvement or to simply monitor performance over time. These two out-of-the-box reports – execution statistics and program documentation – are the most heavily used reports during application development, troubleshooting, and particularly when new methodologies are developed. Users can quickly search through these documents, leverage them to keep track of methodology changes, and use them as documentation for training new team members.

Performing mass updates to existing allocation rules has never been faster. PCMCS contains a menu that allows end users to find and replace specific member name references in their allocations for each individual data slice, allocation step, or an entire scenario. A quick turnaround of such maintenance tasks results in an increased number of iterations through different data sets, giving the cost accounting team more time to perform in-depth analysis rather than waiting for system updates.

PCMCS-embedded analytics and dashboarding functionality is also a significant differentiator, enabling end users to create and share dashboards with the rest of the application users through the common web interface and without the need for IT support. Reports created in PCMCS are available immediately and without time consuming initial setup or migrations between environments followed by further security setup tasks.

A comparison of On-Prem vs Cloud will be available in a future post, so please subscribe below to receive notifications for PCMCS-related blog updates.

Automation in Account Reconciliation Cloud Service (ARCS): At Its Finest

In the previous post, Redesign in Account Reconciliation Cloud Service (ARCS): From the Ground Up, I showed you how to rebuild ARCS down to the Profile Segments to speed things up. This time we’re slowing everything down…

So grab a glass of wine and throw on your Marvin Gaye vinyl because we’re getting it on with ~~automation~~. Oh yeahhh…

The sexiest topic of account reconciliations (didn’t think you’d ever see that sentence, did ya?) consistently revolves around automation. Yes, ARCS provides a central repository. Yes, ARCS is auditable. YES, ARCS shows a traceable workflow throughout the reconciliation cycle. All of these features are highly useful and absolutely a prerequisite to an enterprise worthy solution, but if you want to really grab people’s attention in a design session, start talking about the things they won’t have to do. ARCS provides both out-of-the-box functionality as well as customizable tools that help preparers  focus on high-importance reconciliations rather than spending time on low value-add or monotonous items.

Automation occurs in two areas: outside of ARCS (e.g. data feeds) and within ARCS (e.g. auto reconciliations and rules). Setting up the former enhances the latter. Either Cloud Data Management (CDM) or Financial Data Quality Management Enterprise Edition (FDMEE) can be used to load data to ARCS, albeit in different manners, but how this is accomplished is beyond the scope of this post. This data can be sourced from a variety of general ledgers and sub ledgers/subsystems including Financials Cloud, E-Business Suite (EBS), PeopleSoft, JD Edwards, and even *gasp* Excel (…if we have to…). By automating these data feeds directly from the source, management can be confident in the validity of the data (e.g. accuracy, no manual intervention or “massaging,” live, etc.) and, with scheduling, administrators have one or more fewer task(s) to worry about. The latest application data is up-to-date by the time the office doors open. Additionally, data refreshes can occur multiple times throughout the reconciliation cycle without concern for loss of work. ARCS will only update reconciliations with differences from the last data load and will change the workflow status if data has been modified and needs to be looked at again.

Within ARCS, the “bread and butter” for gaining efficiencies in the reconciliation cycle is through utilizing the out-of-the-box auto reconciliation method property on the Profiles. This will set the conditions under which the reconciliation will automatically change the workflow status to “closed,” allowing preparers to focus on the remaining “open” reconciliations that require attention. Which conditions are available for selection depends on the Format type. Furthermore, this field can be easily updated after-the-fact. Using the Actions pane, this property can be updated to a mass of Profiles based on custom filtering.

Automation in ARCS 1

[Screenshot 10a: The “Set Attribute…” functionality from the Actions pane is a powerful tool that can be used to make mass updates from the user interface.]

 

Automation in ARCS 2

[Screenshot 10b: In this example, the “Set Attribute…” functionality can be used to make updates to the Auto Reconciliation Method property for all Profiles, selected Profiles, or Profiles that fit customized criteria.]

The “Set Attribute” functionality is a powerful tool for making changes across multiple Profiles within the ARCS user interface. In many instances, this is a preferable alternative to extracting the Profiles to a text file to modify offline. Screenshots 10a – 10b show how it can be used to update the Auto Reconciliation Method attribute specifically, but there are a plethora of other attributes that can be updated in this manner.

The last puzzle piece to the trinity of automation is customized rules. Similar to custom attributes, rules can be added in a variety of places within your reconciliations to further enhance and streamline the process for both end-users and application administrators. Attributes, formats, profiles, and even specific transaction types (ex. on Subsystem Adjustments, but not on Source System Adjustments) can contain separate sets of rules.

Automation in ARCS 3

[Screenshot 11a: Rules can be added at a Format level.]

 

Automation in ARCS 4

[Screenshot 11b: Different Rule resolutions will be available depending on where the rule is created. This screenshot, for example, shows the options for rules created at a Format level.]

 

Automation in ARCS 5

[Screenshot 11c: Rules can be added at a specific transaction type. In this screenshot, any rules created here would only affect Subsystem Adjustments and would not affect System Adjustments.]

 

Automation in ARCS 6

[Screenshot 11d: Different Rule resolutions will be available depending on where the rule is created. This screenshot, for example, shows the options for rules created at a specific transaction type level.]

Thus, rules can be used for anything from sweeping, application-wide changes down to differences at a transaction-by-transaction basis, as seen in Screenshots 11a – 11d. If ARCS is a suit, then rules are custom tailoring; they are made to fit your company’s specific needs.

The most common rule I see relates to Auto-Submission (as opposed to Auto Reconciliation). The out-of-the-box auto reconciliation methods previously discussed are set on Profiles and can be used to “close” a reconciliation for the period if the criteria is met. However, sometimes a reconciliation still needs reviewing such as if it is considered higher risk or only during certain periods in the fiscal year. Customized rules can dynamically determine which reconciliations can skip the preparer and be assigned directly to the reviewer, and which are clear to be automatically “closed” for the month (e.g. without approval by a preparer or reviewer). Tailoring rules in this manner still helps the preparers reduce their workload while giving management the confidence that the higher priority reconciliations are being reviewed – the best of both worlds!

No Mistakes with Modularity from “Day 1” to “Day 100”
So, there you have it: the four main manifestations of ARCS’ modularity. While nothing will replace proper planning, ARCS does not permanently punish any application decisions you (or your partner) have made in the past. The tool is able to grow with your company and accommodate your needs as they arise. There’s no reason to pick “today” or “tomorrow” – have them both.

Am I right? Am I off my rocker? You tell me! Answer in the comments below if ARCS’ (or ARM! We haven’t forgotten you…) has been able to accommodate the changes with your company’s growth.

If you like what you’ve read, please consider sharing this article through social media. And let me know in the comments what topic(s) you would like to see covered in future posts.

*Screenshots taken from the patch 1806 release.

Redesign in Account Reconciliation Cloud Service (ARCS): From the Ground Up

We talked about adding new scope in New Scope in Account Reconciliation Cloud Service (ARCS): Add-Ons and modifying your application inside (i.e. changing reconciliation methods) and outside of ARCS (i.e. new data feeds) in Modifications in Account Reconciliation Cloud Service (ARCS): Tweaking and Tuning.

Today, we’re going to tear it down and rebuild from the ground up.

Let me start with this:  redesign IS possible. ARCS does not permanently punish any design decisions made on “Day 1,”…but not all changes are equal in complexity, nor can all changes be made without consequence. A successful implementation ensures that the application design is sound for today and that a well laid roadmap is in place for tomorrow. Many “one-off” changes can be made directly to a deployed reconciliation (i.e. only within a single period) or permanently going forward (i.e. to the profile). The “catch” is the key properties set on a profile or reconciliation – the Account ID. The Account ID represents the granularity at which the reconciliation is being performed, such as [Business Unit]-[Account] or [Entity]-[Natural Account]-[Subaccount].

ARCS From the Ground Up 1[Screenshot 6: The Account ID is a unique identifier for the reconciliation.]

The Account ID is fundamental to the reconciliation, as indicated by the asterisks (i.e. “*”) in Screenshot 6. Changing it in any way will break the Prior Reconciliation “link” with previously completed instances of the reconciliation.

But let’s push that idea one step further – what if I want to change the key properties themselves – that is to say – change the actual Profile Segments? The Profile Segments determine the name (ex. from “Company” to “Business Unit”), number (ex. from 2 to 3 segments), and even type of values (ex. setting up the Business Unit segment to always be an integer) that are viable for use when setting up an Account ID. Therefore, if this was set up incorrectly or if the granularity at which reconciliations are performed has changed since the initial implementation, then redesigning the Profile Segments may become a requirement.

ARCS even makes this type of redesign possible, but at a cost. An administrator needs to first delete all Profiles; only then will the application allow a modification to the Profiles Segments in the Configuration card.

ARCS From the Ground Up 2[Screenshot 7a: Unable to modify the Name of Profile Segment 1 which is currently named “Company.” The field appears grayed out. This is because Profiles are currently using these Profile Segments.]

ARCS From the Ground Up 3[Screenshot 7b: After removing the Profiles, Profile Segment 1 is now able to be modified. In the example, Profile Segment is renamed to “Business Unit.”]

While Screenshots 7a & 7b show that this is possible, there are repercussions. Similar to changing the Account IDs, this change will break any links to previously completed reconciliations. Additionally, any existing mappings within outside Integration solutions such as Cloud Data Manager or FDMEE, or references to Profile Segments in customized attributes or rules may be affected. This type of redesign should only be done after carefully considering all options.

Other common questions relate to redesigning an attribute, typically the system attributes such as Process or Account Type. This is a straightforward change as it relates to updating the property on the Profiles; however, it is important to note that any reference to any existing artifact (i.e. an artifact can be a format, a custom attribute, an attribute member, etc.) within ARCS will prevent the deletion of said artifact. As an example, if the Account Type structure requires redesigning, but there is a reference to any of the members (such as in a historical period), then these members cannot be deleted without first removing the references. This can be tedious when there are multiple years of reconciliations to consider.

ARCS From the Ground Up 4

[Screenshot 8: When trying to remove the Custom Attribute named “PLACE CUSTOM ATTRIBUTE HERE,” ARCS prevents this deletion and cites which artifact is using the Custom Attribute. In this example, the Bank Reconciliation format is using this Custom Attribute – thus, it cannot be deleted.]

Unlike many system messages, ARCS actually provides useful troubleshooting information as seen in Screenshot 8. However, it still may not be worth it to you to retroactively make this change. A recommendation is to “archive” artifacts that will not be used going forward by renaming them with “Old” or “Hist,” then create a separate artifact to use going forward.

ARCS From the Ground Up 5[Screenshot 9: A work-around to deleting previously used artifacts is to rename them and then use a new artifact going forward. In this example, the suffix “- Old” is added to this Custom Attribute to indicate that it is no longer in use.]

Previous uses of the artifact such as in completed reconciliations will update to reflect the name change. In the example provided in Screenshot 9, this custom attribute for historical periods will be updated with the “– Old” suffix to indicate to ARCS administrators that it is no longer in use but was used historically.

ARCS is a flexible application solution that allows for nearly any change to be made, though the effort and complexity will vary. While sound design can prevent many issues, it should be a comfort to know that there is “wiggle room” if the requirements change in the future.

Join me in the last post of the ARCS modularity series – a real crowd pleaser: Automation in Account Reconciliation Cloud Service (ARCS): At Its Finest

*Screenshots taken from the patch 1806 release.

Modifications in Account Reconciliation Cloud Service (ARCS): Tweaking and Tuning

In the last post, New Scope in Account Reconciliation Cloud Service (ARCS): Add-Ons, we discussed how ARCS sets you up to easily add on additional scope to your existing application and scale your solution. However, not all changes are brand new. Clients are often concerned with being pigeonholed based on their “Day 1” decisions. A common question I am asked during a design session is “Can I manually enter this reconciliation today, but create new feeds to automatically load the data tomorrow?” The answer is a resounding YES, and it provides clear added value to the next phase of any ARCS (or ARM) project. It can be a viable project strategy to set up reconciliations using an Account Analysis format on “Day 1” and change to a Balance Comparison format when automated data loads are built on “Day 100.”

Modifications in ARCS 1

[Screenshot 5a: Reconciliation 100-1000 is setup with a Balance Comparison format in Sep 2017.*]

Modifications in ARCS 2

[Screenshot 5b: The previous period’s reconciliation can be viewed in the Prior Reconciliations tab.*]

Modifications in ARCS 3

[Screenshot 5c: Reconciliation 100-1000 was previously setup with an Account Analysis format in Aug 2017. The format of a profile can be changed while maintaining the Prior Reconciliations link.*]

Depending on how this change is made, it is even possible to keep the modified reconciliation “linked” to the previously completed reconciliations even though the Format has changed, such as in Screenshots 5a – 5c. The ease with which ARCS allows you to change Reconciliation Methods (via Formats) gives you the flexibility to not bite off more than you can chew in the beginning of a project.

Changing Reconciliation Methods is often related to new integrations. Moving from the manual “fat fingering” of data to directly loading general ledger and sub ledger balances through Financial Data Management Enterprise Edition (FDMEE) or Data Management combined with the inbuilt auto-reconciliation tools can bring a “quality of life” change for end users as well as added confidence in the data’s integrity. It is always a best practice to pull data from the source. Creating the integration from the general ledger is typically part of the initial scope. The usual candidates for building additional feeds after the first project phase are the sub ledgers related to fixed assets, accounts receivables, and accounts payables. However, the most “bang for your buck” as it relates to what integrations to build depends on your line of business and specific company requirements.*

*Note that adding multiple general ledger feeds introduces additional complexities beyond the scope of this article. Please consult with your Oracle partner before adding to your application.

In some cases, the greatest efficiencies to your existing reconciliation process are gained in utilizing the power of ARCS Transaction Matching. This module is better suited to handle massive data volumes at a transactional level. As an example, instead of performing just a reconciliation of the balance sheet’s intercompany balances in ARCS Reconciliation Compliance at the end of the month, an enhancement to this process could be to perform the daily matching process in ARCS Transaction Matching to clear up issues in real time as they arise. This simplifies the month end’s reconciliation. ARCS Transaction Matching is a powerful supplement to an existing reconciliation system and continues to receive special attention from Oracle as seen with the major release of new functionality in Patch 1805.

Just as there are many ways your company can change, ARCS can be modified to match your needs even in a live application. However, sometimes changes are more fundamental than a bit of tweaking such as in an acquisition or the introduction of a new, company-wide general ledger. Or, perhaps, you are just not satisfied with the solution design. Join me in the next post as we discuss the dangerous topic of redesign in ARCS – what is possible…and what it costs.

In the next post, Redesign in Account Reconciliation Cloud Service (ARCS): From the Ground Up, learn how redesign IS possible in ARCS.

*Screenshots taken from the patch 1806 release.

New Scope in Account Reconciliation Cloud Service (ARCS): Add-Ons

This post follows last week’s post Modularity in Account Reconciliation Cloud Service (ARCS): No Mistakes from “Day 1” to “Day 100.”

Out-of-the-box, ARCS makes it easy to “oh, and this!” when adding new scope. The obvious example is monthly maintenance. Reconciliation Administrators and Power Users can build new Profiles to deploy for future months (or even the current month) with relative ease. With the “Copy” feature, previously created Profiles can serve as ready-to-use templates and reduce the manual effort involved in building a Profile from scratch.

New Scope in Account Reconciliation Cloud Service (ARCS) - Add-Ons 1

[Screenshot 1: The Copy function from the Actions drop-down list can be used to duplicate existing Profiles*]

Copying existing Profiles, as seen in Screenshot 1, is intuitive, built-in functionality. This makes ARCS “Quick Starts” a popular project option when tight on a budget – the Partner will be contracted to create a limited subset of Profiles and the Client can then use these as a starting point to build out the rest, saving on the Build Phase effort.

Another common post-project add are Custom Attributes. As companies become more familiar with how their end users utilize the tool, new Custom Attributes can be included for reporting purposes (such as filtering or sorting in dashboards), providing information, or collecting feedback. Beyond the three system attributes of Process, Account Type, and Risk Rating, some typical Custom Attributes include source system names, supplemental detail such as cost center or department, or even more dynamic fields such as auto-populating metadata descriptions. Furthermore, where these are placed within a reconciliation changes the nature of what detail is being provided or collected. Custom Attributes can be placed at a reconciliation’s summary level, on each individual transaction, and even on the specific Action Plans within each transaction. Additionally, these can be inherited from a Format or set for individual Profiles. What information is useful or relevant to end users will change depending on the granularity.

New Scope in Account Reconciliation Cloud Service (ARCS) - Add-Ons 2[Screenshot 2: Custom Attribute on the Summary tab*]

New Scope in Account Reconciliation Cloud Service (ARCS) - Add-Ons 3[Screenshot 3: Custom Attribute on a Transaction*]

New Scope in Account Reconciliation Cloud Service (ARCS) - Add-Ons 4[Screenshot 4: Custom Attribute on an Action Plan*]

The variety of locations within the reconciliation to place these Custom Attributes, as seen in Screenshots 2 – 4, and the ease at which these can be added provides your company with the flexibility to determine ‘what’ and ‘where’ information should be presented.

ARCS provides a plethora of tools to grow the application with your company and add-on to your “Day 1” implementation. But what if you like what you have built, and just want to tweak it?  Perhaps you want to move from “fat fingering” to fully integrating with your ERP source systems? The next post, Modifications in Account Reconciliation Cloud Service (ARCS): Tweaking and Tuning, discusses how ARCS can be modularly modified, keeping what you have…but better.

*Screenshots taken from the patch 1806 release.

Modularity in Account Reconciliation Cloud Service (ARCS): No Mistakes from “Day 1” to “Day 100”

Modularity. My initial experience with this concept was during the build of my first computer. There is a great, omnipresent dread that consumes people who share this hobby – imagine this scenario (or nightmare rather!): you have just invested significant time, energy, and finances to create the perfect machine – only to have it rendered obsolete the next month by changing technology that is incompatible with your swanky new rig! The warring decision of function today versus future proofing for tomorrow is a constant struggle for all tech lovers (or tech survivors, as the case may be). So when a product is able to overcome this dilemma, it’s got my attention.

ARCS Modularity 1a

In my post A Safe Step into the Cloud: The Argument for Account Reconciliation Cloud Service (ARCS), I discussed the modular nature of ARCS as one of the key pillars that made the product an easy recommendation as a first step into the Cloud. For new projects, this is a comforting “safety cushion.” For existing applications, it means you are not stuck with what you have. Push your product to evolve with your needs and ensure that you are eking out every drop of value from your investment.

With ever-changing requirements, it is critical to know what tools are at your disposal. Some changes are straightforward; others…not so much. In this upcoming series of blog posts, we will discuss what it means for ARCS to be a modular solution and explore the four main ways in which this manifests:

  1. New scope
  2. Modifications
  3. Redesign
  4. Automation.

Over the next few weeks, we will be tweaking, tuning, tearing down, and putting the application back together to see how there can be no mistakes with modularity.

View the next post in this series:  New Scope in Account Reconciliation Cloud Service (ARCS): Add-Ons