Retro Reboot #1: Set It & Forget It – Scheduling FDMEE Tasks

As with most nostalgic items, reboots are the next best thing. From video game consoles to television shows, they are all getting a modern facelift and a new prime-time seat on television.  I have jumped on that band-wagon to revitalize a previous post authored by Tony Scalese: Set it & Forget It – Scheduling FDM Tasks.

As with most reboots, there must be flair and alluring content to capture old and new audiences. Since Oracle Financial Data Quality Management Enterprise Edition (FDMEE) has been in the Enterprise Performance Management (EPM) space for a while and has moved into the Cloud, this is a great time for its reboot!

Oh Great…A Reboot. Now What?

 Scheduling tasks in FDMEE has never been easier. Oracle provides several ways to do this for a variety of out-of-the-box activities.  Is there a report that you want to run and email every hour?  Or how about a script that needs to run hourly?  Or maybe batch-automation every 15 minutes?  No worries!  FDMEE can handle all of that with out-of-the-box functionality.

Let us pause for a moment and determine what is needed to make this happen:

  1. Is there a business case and justification for what is about to be scheduled?
  2. Who benefits and how will they be notified of the results?
  3. Is there a defined frequency for which the activity must take place?

Getting Started

First, understand that the scheduling for FDMEE is built directly into the Graphical User Interface (GUI) anywhere you see the “SCHEDULE” button. Unlike the previous FDM counterpart which had it as an independent utility to be installed/configured, the ease of having it via the Web has removed some complexity.

A word of caution:  while this screen allows items to be scheduled, there isn’t a screen that shows “what has been” scheduled.  To do that, access to the Oracle Data Integrator (ODI) is needed, but more on this later.

Initially, the screen shows the types of schedules that can be created and their relevant inputs.

Retro Reboot Screen Shot 1

Below is a reference guide to outline FDMEE’s scheduling capabilities.

Schedule Type Inputs Notes / Examples
Simple TimeZone, Date, HH:MM:SS, AM/PM Single run based on the specified inputs.

 

Example:  Run 08/02/2018 @ 11AM

Hourly TimeZone, MM:SS Repeatable run at the specified time MM:SS time.

 

Example:  Run every hour, at the 22minute mark.

Daily TimeZone, HH:MM:SS, AM/PM Every day at the specified time.

 

Example:  Run every day at 11AM.

Weekly TimeZone, Day of the Week, HH:MM:SS, AM/PM Every specified day at the specified time.

 

Example: Run every Monday thru  Friday at  11AM.

Monthly
(day of month)
TimeZone, Date, HH:MM:SS, AM/PM Specified day at the specified time.

 

Example: Run on the 2nd day of every month at 11AM.

Monthly
(week day)
TimeZone, Iteration, Weekday, HH:MM:SS, AM/PM Specified interval and week day at the specified time.

 

Example: Run every third Tuesday at 11AM.

Why Does the Job Run Under My UserID?

That is because the system assigns the user’s credentials who created the schedule. What can go wrong with that, right?!  Well, if a user no longer exists or a password is changed, the existing jobs will no longer run.

The following considerations should be observed:

  1. Dedicate a service account that is not being used by an employee to be used for server/automation actions.
  2. This account can be a “native” user; since the account is only used internally for EPM products, having a domain account is not needed.
  3. Non-expiry passwords are best.

 It is Scheduled…Now What?

After the item is scheduled, what really happens? The action executes at the scheduled time!  Actions can easily be monitored via the FDMEE Process Details screen.  Now all the possibilities of scheduling the following can be explored:

  1. Data Load Rules
  2. Script Executions
  3. Batch Executions
  4. Report Executions

Also, as mentioned earlier, there is no way to see the batches inside of FDMEE. For that, information can be retrieved in a few ways.  The easiest way to see what is scheduled is to use the ODI Studio.

The ODI Studio provides details as seen in the screen shot below:

Retro Reboot Screen Shot 2

Any scheduled tasks will be listed under “All Schedules.” Simply double click them to obtain details related to that task.

Retro Reboot Screen Shot 3

Another effective option is to write a custom report that displays the information. My previous blog, Easy Value with FDMEE Reports, post provides further details of FDMEE report options and their value.  This would allow a report to be executed to provide a user-friendly report.

Seriously … What Now?

By now, you may have noticed from the previous blog post http://classic.fdmguru.com/ups-shell/) that the upsShell process is quite handy.  It allows other tools to control the FDM jobs…maybe through a corporate scheduler.  Now that most organizations have a corporate scheduler, the new FDMEE options below must be learned:

Command Purpose
Executescript.bat / .sh Executes an FDMEE Custom Script
Importmapping.bat / .sh Executes an import from text-file for Maps
Loaddata.bat / .sh Executes a Data Load Rule
Loadhrdata.bat / .sh Executes an HR Data Load Rule
Loadmetadata.bat / .sh Executes a Metadata Load Rule
Runbatch.bat / .sh Executes a defined Batch
Runreport.bat / .sh Executes a defined Report

*All files are stored in the EPM_ORACLE_HOME\products\FinancialDataQuality\bin\

In the example below, the command, when launched, executes a Data Load Rule for Jan-2012 thru Mar-2012:

Retro Reboot Screen Shot 4

There still must be a better solution…right? Things to overcome:

  1. What happens if the scheduler is Windows-based and the server is Linux?
  2. How does a separate scheduling server communicate with EPM? Does it have to be installed on each EPM Server?
  3. How can we monitor and get details of a job once it is kicked off?

What Happens if You Don’t Want to Run the .BAT/.SH Files?

You’re in luck! With the introduction of new functionality to FDMEE, RESTful APIs are also now available.  With the RESTful APIs, not only can you execute a job, but you can also loop and monitor for the results.  This enhances the previous .BAT/.SH file routines and provides a cleaner and more elegant solution.

Command Purpose
Running Data Rules Execute a Data Load Rule
Running Batch Rules Execute a Batch Definition
Import Data Mapping Import Maps
Export Data Mapping Export Maps
Execute Reports Execute a Report

*URL construct: https://<SERVICE_NAME>/aif/rest/V1

The below example is just querying for a process:

Retro Reboot Screen Shot 5

The Future…

As Oracle moves forward to enhance the RESTful APIs, many doors continue to open for FDMEE and tool scheduling. At Edgewater Ranzal, we fully embrace the RESTful concept and evolve our solutions to utilize this functionality.  The result is improved support and flexibility of FDMEE and the future of Oracle Cloud products.

Contact us at info@ranzal.com with questions about this product or its capabilities.

The Data Governance Triple Crown

A few weeks ago, those who follow horse racing witnessed a historic event. The race horse Justified captured the Triple Crown by winning the Belmont Stakes following earlier victories in the Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes. Justified became only the 13th horse in history to capture the Triple Crown, and the second horse to do so in the last 4 years (American Pharoah captured the honor in 2015). Interesting side note: both Justified and American Pharoah were trained by Bob Baffert. Why does that matter? Because he’s a fellow Arizonan native and University of Arizona alumnus, that’s why! Bear Down!

While it may be a stretch, the concept of a “triple crown” of sorts has been on my mind recently as it relates to recent Oracle Enterprise Performance Management (EPM) projects I’ve been working on involving Oracle Data Relationship Management (DRM) and Data Relationship Governance (DRG). Many people are familiar with the DRG module of the DRM product, but when the tool is coupled with two other critical components, you are well on your way to capturing the Data Governance Triple Crown.

1.    Tool – Data Relationship Governance

As you may know, DRG is a module of the DRM product and provides a governance framework for maintaining your DRM master data. DRG includes functionality such as workflows, approvals, email notifications, and separation of duties (to prevent someone from approving his own request). Workflows are often structured around dimension maintenance and may include requests like “Add Account,” “Update Account,” or “Move Account.” The workflow then guides the requester to select tasks and complete fields on a data entry form. Once submitted, the request enters optional enrichment stages where additional detail and context is added to the request before finally being committed and updating the relevant DRM structures.

Here are just a few of the key features in DRG:

  • Requests can be entered interactively or via bulk upload files
  • Documents (such as supporting request documentation, emails, or policies) can be attached to requests
  • Comments/supporting narrative can be included
  • Requests can be pushed back to a prior stage, approved, or rejected
  • Request can generate email notifications to approvers and/or participants in a workflow requests
  • Requests can include validations, calculated fields, and conditional criteria to enter or bypass specific stages in the workflow

While I could go on and on about DRG, I’ve noticed a DRG implementation is most effective when paired with two other components.

2.    Process – Data Governance Program

In my experience, DRG implementations are most successful when bundled into a broader data governance program. Data governance programs bring together the Tool (DRG), the People (data stewards, data specialists, data governance council), and the Process (process flows, metrics, and standards).

Key facets to an effective data governance program include:

  • Executive sponsorship
  • Data Governance Council
  • Clear Roles and Responsibilities
  • Standards (metrics, definitions, process flows)
  • Authority and Accountability

Data governance programs are not easy! The change management aspect to implementing effective data governance cannot be underestimated. There will be natural resistance, pushback, and challenges to any type of change, and data governance initiatives are no exception. Data governance implementations require patience and perseverance, and at times, even a bit of the “carrot and stick” approach. As a result, we have seen the following steps as crucial to getting your data governance program off the ground:

    1. Define Charter Team and Responsibilities
    2. Define the Mission Statement
    3. Define the High-Level Scope
    4. Define the Terminology and Standards
    5. Define the Current State Overview
    6. Define the Future State Vision
    7. Define the Draft Phased Approach
    8. Prepare the Project Charter
    9. Present the Project Charter for Executive Approval
    10. Ensure Executive Support

While there is much more content to dive into on a data governance program that is beyond the scope of this blog, I hope you appreciate the importance of People and Process in a data governance initiative and do not focus only on the Tool.

3.    Integration – DRM to External Systems

The third and final component to effective data governance, after the Tool and Process, is integration to external systems. This allows DRM to truly become the master data hub in your company’s eco-system and systematically push master data (which could include trees/hierarchies, base members, mappings, or all of the above) to both upstream and downstream systems.

By leveraging DRM’s robust integration capabilities and adding in some custom SQL or ETL integration as needed, DRM can produce master data in various forms (flat files, SQL tables, web services, external commits) for consumption by external applications. And these integrations can be run on-demand or scheduled.

Summary

So there you have it. Three critical components to effective data governance: a good tool (DRG), a robust process (data governance program), and automated integration (with DRM as the hub).

Are any of these components effective in their own right? Certainly. Each area adds value in its own right and can be implemented standalone. But when all three components are implemented in conjunction, the whole is definitely greater than the sum of the parts. Each component presents its own set of challenges and requires close collaboration with both technical and business personnel at a customer. And executive sponsorship and buy-in is absolutely vital to managing and overcoming the inevitable change management challenges. It ain’t easy, but like the saying goes, nothing worthwhile ever is, right?

I’d love to hear your thoughts on this topic along with any best practices, lessons learned, or battle scars earned along the way. Feel free to connect with me on LinkedIn or Twitter.

Come See Edgewater Ranzal at Kscope11

ODTUG Kscope11 is right around the corner. Kscope11 offers the chance for a full day EPM Symposium on Sunday, plus the opportunity to learn from experts in the EPM and BI fields on a wide range of topics.

Edgewater Ranzal will be well represented at the conference, with our associates presenting eight presentations covering Planning, DRM, EPMA, HFM, and FDM. The sessions that we will be presenting at Kscope11 are summarized below. Each title links to an abstract for the presentation, providing additional details.

Session No. Date Time Room Presenter Title
1 6/27/11 11:15 – 12:15 102C Jeff Richardson Calculation Manager:  The New and Improved Application to Create Planning Business Rules
7 6/28/11 11:15 – 12:15 103C Tony Scalese Planning (or Essbase) and FDM and ERPi Equals Success!
10 6/28/11 4:30 – 5:30 101B Chris Barbieri Security and Auditing in HFM
11 6/29/11 8:30 – 9:30 103A Patrick Lehner Best Practices for Using DRM with EPMA
11 6/29/11 8:30 – 9:30 101B Chris Barbieri Getting Started with Calc Manager for HFM
12 6/29/11 9:45 – 10:45 101B Chris Barbieri Advanced Topics in Calc Manager for HFM
12 6/29/11 9:45 – 10:45 102C John Martin Have it Your Way: Building Planning Hierarchies with EPMA or Outline Load Utility
13 6/29/11 11:15 – 12:15 101B Tony Scalese Maximizing the Value of an EPM Investment with ERPi, FDM, & EPMA
17 6/30/11 8:30 – 9:30 101B Tony Scalese Taking Your FDM Application to the Next Level with Advanced Scripting
18 6/30/11 10:30 – 11:30 101B Peter Fugere IFRS Reporting Within Hyperion Financial Management

In addition to the presentations above, you can catch up with our experts at our booth in the Vendor Showcase.

We look forward to seeing you in Long Beach. If you haven’t already registered, you can do so here.

Business Intelligence Technology Environment – Welcome to the Buffet

Business Intelligence Technology Environment or BITE is my own little tag line and acronym (maybe I should copyright it) to express the host of solutions available in the Business Intelligence application world today. (It could also be used as a verb to describe the plethora of poorly designed solutions… ahh but that is another story.)

My current blog series will be Oracle EPM/BI+ solution centric while remaining Oracle EPM/BI+ application agnostic (now dictionary.com is paying off). I hope that you will enjoy this real life approach to the process of decision making on software solutions interspersed with some genuine tips and tricks of the trade — some that you have seen before and some you have never imagined.

In other words, I hope that you will not find this blog to be represented by my newly coined acronym — BITE.

Rules of conduct while at the Buffet

First we need a definition. Yes a definition! Don’t be afraid, definitions are a good thing, they keep us grounded, they set limits and finally they determine if we are true to our mission. I define BITE as processes, software and goals needed to precisely solution the business data critical to the legal, accounting and business decision needs of a specific entity.

Inventive techno junkies, single tool consultants and one track sales people – CLOSE YOUR EYES / SHEILD YOUR COMPUTERS for this next statement else you might go blind. “Precisely Solution” in the definition of BITE includes the moral imperative of not misusing software for intent other than its design and picking software that fits the current business life cycle of a company. (Those of you with Software Misuse problems, I will be posting a number you can call to get help. Remember the first step is admitting you have a problem.)

The application stack for EPM / BI+; HFM, Essbase (with all its add-on modules), Smart View, OBIE, OBAW, FDM, DRM, ODI and a few products you might not have heard about or you’ve heard about but never assessed for your purposes. NO, NO, No, no folks this is not a software sales blog, it’s a solutions blog and in our solutions toolbox we need to do more than use a single hammer creatively to remain competitive from an efficiency and business life cycle standpoint.

The Personalities in the Buffet Line

Now that we have some parameters (and I know it was painful for you left brainers) by which we can solution, we need some realistic company situations to solution. Let’s start with four companies each different in their business life cycle, staff sizes and demands for a BITE at success. You can email me if you will absolutely die without a very specific company example however, I cannot boil the ocean here in this blog (small ponds are all that will be possible).

Our four companies need to be different to see solutions in the work. Let’s pick a manufacturer, a technology company, a retailer and a commodity group. In my next addition we will outline the companies, their mission, their needs and their resources.

Why not EPMA…who needs DRM?

Should I use EPMA or DRM?

Should I use EPMA or DRM?

Over the past several months, and quite possibly the past year or two, there have been numerous discussions regarding the need for a separate master data management (MDM) tool such as Hyperion / Oracle Data Relationship Management (DRM) to manage Hyperion metadata outside of the Enterprise Performance Management Architect (EPMA) tool that comes with Hyperion System 9 and Oracle Fusion 11.

Recently at a users’ conference, I heard comments like “EPMA is DRM ‘Light’” and “EPMA is DRM with a Web interface”.

Hyperion, and obviously now Oracle, has invested deeply in EPMA and it is difficult to identify how and where it might differ from the DRM product. Oracle has even used portions of the DRM base code and underlying architecture in EPMA and when looking at vapor-ware demos, you might draw similar conclusions to those quotes above. In reality, EPMA, in its current state, is a pumped up version of the old Hyperion HUB as it relates to metadata management. Granted, EPMA has updated the user interface leveraging the glyphs (icons) and nomenclature from DRM while completely missing the intellectual aptitude that a master data tool provides.

Below are the key uses that were provided in a recent Oracle presentation as well shows the difference between EPMA and DRM:
EPMA
  • Unifies and aligns application administration processes across the Hyperion EPM system
  • Imports and shares business dimensions in the Dimension Library
  • Builds, validates, and deploys applications in the Application Library
  • Designs and maintains business rules in Calculation Manager
  • Loads and synchronizes transaction data into and between EPM applications

DRM

  • Manages change of business master data across enterprise applications
  • Consolidates and rationalizes structures across source systems
  • Conforms dimensions and validate integrity of attributes and relationships
  • Synchronizes alternate business views with corporate hierarchies
  • Key Features include:

           i.      Versioning and Modeling
           ii.     Custom rules and validation
           iii.    Configurable exports
           iv.    Granular security
           v.     Change tracking

 *Oracle Hyperion Data Relationship Management, Fusion Edition 11.1.1– Robin Peel