Retro Reboot #1: Set It & Forget It – Scheduling FDMEE Tasks

As with most nostalgic items, reboots are the next best thing. From video game consoles to television shows, they are all getting a modern facelift and a new prime-time seat on television.  I have jumped on that band-wagon to revitalize a previous post authored by Tony Scalese: Set it & Forget It – Scheduling FDM Tasks.

As with most reboots, there must be flair and alluring content to capture old and new audiences. Since Oracle Financial Data Quality Management Enterprise Edition (FDMEE) has been in the Enterprise Performance Management (EPM) space for a while and has moved into the Cloud, this is a great time for its reboot!

Oh Great…A Reboot. Now What?

 Scheduling tasks in FDMEE has never been easier. Oracle provides several ways to do this for a variety of out-of-the-box activities.  Is there a report that you want to run and email every hour?  Or how about a script that needs to run hourly?  Or maybe batch-automation every 15 minutes?  No worries!  FDMEE can handle all of that with out-of-the-box functionality.

Let us pause for a moment and determine what is needed to make this happen:

  1. Is there a business case and justification for what is about to be scheduled?
  2. Who benefits and how will they be notified of the results?
  3. Is there a defined frequency for which the activity must take place?

Getting Started

First, understand that the scheduling for FDMEE is built directly into the Graphical User Interface (GUI) anywhere you see the “SCHEDULE” button. Unlike the previous FDM counterpart which had it as an independent utility to be installed/configured, the ease of having it via the Web has removed some complexity.

A word of caution:  while this screen allows items to be scheduled, there isn’t a screen that shows “what has been” scheduled.  To do that, access to the Oracle Data Integrator (ODI) is needed, but more on this later.

Initially, the screen shows the types of schedules that can be created and their relevant inputs.

Retro Reboot Screen Shot 1

Below is a reference guide to outline FDMEE’s scheduling capabilities.

Schedule Type Inputs Notes / Examples
Simple TimeZone, Date, HH:MM:SS, AM/PM Single run based on the specified inputs.

 

Example:  Run 08/02/2018 @ 11AM

Hourly TimeZone, MM:SS Repeatable run at the specified time MM:SS time.

 

Example:  Run every hour, at the 22minute mark.

Daily TimeZone, HH:MM:SS, AM/PM Every day at the specified time.

 

Example:  Run every day at 11AM.

Weekly TimeZone, Day of the Week, HH:MM:SS, AM/PM Every specified day at the specified time.

 

Example: Run every Monday thru  Friday at  11AM.

Monthly
(day of month)
TimeZone, Date, HH:MM:SS, AM/PM Specified day at the specified time.

 

Example: Run on the 2nd day of every month at 11AM.

Monthly
(week day)
TimeZone, Iteration, Weekday, HH:MM:SS, AM/PM Specified interval and week day at the specified time.

 

Example: Run every third Tuesday at 11AM.

Why Does the Job Run Under My UserID?

That is because the system assigns the user’s credentials who created the schedule. What can go wrong with that, right?!  Well, if a user no longer exists or a password is changed, the existing jobs will no longer run.

The following considerations should be observed:

  1. Dedicate a service account that is not being used by an employee to be used for server/automation actions.
  2. This account can be a “native” user; since the account is only used internally for EPM products, having a domain account is not needed.
  3. Non-expiry passwords are best.

 It is Scheduled…Now What?

After the item is scheduled, what really happens? The action executes at the scheduled time!  Actions can easily be monitored via the FDMEE Process Details screen.  Now all the possibilities of scheduling the following can be explored:

  1. Data Load Rules
  2. Script Executions
  3. Batch Executions
  4. Report Executions

Also, as mentioned earlier, there is no way to see the batches inside of FDMEE. For that, information can be retrieved in a few ways.  The easiest way to see what is scheduled is to use the ODI Studio.

The ODI Studio provides details as seen in the screen shot below:

Retro Reboot Screen Shot 2

Any scheduled tasks will be listed under “All Schedules.” Simply double click them to obtain details related to that task.

Retro Reboot Screen Shot 3

Another effective option is to write a custom report that displays the information. My previous blog, Easy Value with FDMEE Reports, post provides further details of FDMEE report options and their value.  This would allow a report to be executed to provide a user-friendly report.

Seriously … What Now?

By now, you may have noticed from the previous blog post http://classic.fdmguru.com/ups-shell/) that the upsShell process is quite handy.  It allows other tools to control the FDM jobs…maybe through a corporate scheduler.  Now that most organizations have a corporate scheduler, the new FDMEE options below must be learned:

Command Purpose
Executescript.bat / .sh Executes an FDMEE Custom Script
Importmapping.bat / .sh Executes an import from text-file for Maps
Loaddata.bat / .sh Executes a Data Load Rule
Loadhrdata.bat / .sh Executes an HR Data Load Rule
Loadmetadata.bat / .sh Executes a Metadata Load Rule
Runbatch.bat / .sh Executes a defined Batch
Runreport.bat / .sh Executes a defined Report

*All files are stored in the EPM_ORACLE_HOME\products\FinancialDataQuality\bin\

In the example below, the command, when launched, executes a Data Load Rule for Jan-2012 thru Mar-2012:

Retro Reboot Screen Shot 4

There still must be a better solution…right? Things to overcome:

  1. What happens if the scheduler is Windows-based and the server is Linux?
  2. How does a separate scheduling server communicate with EPM? Does it have to be installed on each EPM Server?
  3. How can we monitor and get details of a job once it is kicked off?

What Happens if You Don’t Want to Run the .BAT/.SH Files?

You’re in luck! With the introduction of new functionality to FDMEE, RESTful APIs are also now available.  With the RESTful APIs, not only can you execute a job, but you can also loop and monitor for the results.  This enhances the previous .BAT/.SH file routines and provides a cleaner and more elegant solution.

Command Purpose
Running Data Rules Execute a Data Load Rule
Running Batch Rules Execute a Batch Definition
Import Data Mapping Import Maps
Export Data Mapping Export Maps
Execute Reports Execute a Report

*URL construct: https://<SERVICE_NAME>/aif/rest/V1

The below example is just querying for a process:

Retro Reboot Screen Shot 5

The Future…

As Oracle moves forward to enhance the RESTful APIs, many doors continue to open for FDMEE and tool scheduling. At Edgewater Ranzal, we fully embrace the RESTful concept and evolve our solutions to utilize this functionality.  The result is improved support and flexibility of FDMEE and the future of Oracle Cloud products.

Contact us at info@ranzal.com with questions about this product or its capabilities.

An Exploration of the EDMCS REST API

Recently my team and I had the opportunity to implement Oracle’s newest offering – Enterprise Data Management Cloud Service (EDMCS). EDMCS for those of you who are not familiar provides a cloud-based solution for managing master data (also referred to as metadata) across the organization.  Some like to refer to EDMCS as Data Relationship Manager (DRM) in the Cloud, but the truth is, EDMCS is not DRM in the Cloud.

EDMCS is a completely new vision of what master data management can and should be. The architect of this new cloud offering is the same person who founded Razza Solutions which was the company that developed the product now known as DRM.  That is important to know because it ensures that the best of what DRM has to offer is brought forward.  But, more importantly, it ensures that the learnings and wish list of capabilities that DRM should have are in the forefront of the developers’ minds.

Ok, now let’s get back to fun stuff. In the 18.05 patch for EDMCS, the REST API (v1) was exposed for public usage.  The documentation for the REST API can be found here:

https://docs.oracle.com/en/cloud/saas/enterprise-data-management-cloud/edmra/rest-endpoints.html

As I highlighted in the previous post Troubleshooting Cloud Data Management Metadata Load Errors, I had developed an automation routine to upload EDMCS extracts to both PBCS and FCCS using FDMEE and Cloud Data Management.  We had been eagerly awaiting the REST API for EDMCS to finalize this automation routine and provide a true end-to-end process that can be scheduled or initialized via a single action.

Let’s take a quick look back at the automation routine developed for this customer. After the metadata has been exported to a flat file from EDMCS, the automation would upload a copy to the PBCS and FCCS pods, launch Cloud Data Management data load rules which would process the EDMCS metadata extracts, run a restructure of the database after all dimensions had been loaded, and then send a status email alerting the administrator of the result.  While elegant, I considered this to be incomplete.

Automation, in my view, is a process that can be executed without user interaction. While an automation routine certainly has parameters that must be generally maintained, once those parameters are set/updated, the automation cycle should not be dependent on user input or action.  In the aforementioned solution, we were beholden to the fact that EDMCS exports had to be run interactively; however, with the introduction of the publicly exposed REST API in the 18.05 EDMCS patch, we are now able to automate the extract of metadata from EDMCS.  That means we can finally complete our fully automated, end-to-end solution for loading metadata.  Let’s review the EDMCS REST API and how we did it.

The REST API for EDMCS is structured similar to other Oracle EPM REST APIs. By this, I mean that multiple REST commands may need to be executed to achieve a functional result.  For example, when executing a Cloud Data Management data load rule via the Data Management REST API, the actual execution of the data load rule is handled by a POST call to the jobs function with the required payload (e.g. DLR name, start period, etc.).  This call is just one portion of a functional requirement.  To achieve an actual data load, a file may need to be uploaded to the cloud, the data load rule initialized, and then the status of the data load rule be retrieved.  To achieve this functional result, three unique REST API executions would need to occur.

To export metadata from EDMCS to a flat file using the REST API, the following needs to be executed:

  1. Get the dimension information for the EDMCS application from which metadata will be exported
  2. Execute an export of the dimension(s)
  3. Determine the status of export
  4. Download the export to a flat file

Let’s explore each of these in a little more detail. First, we need to get the dimension IDs for the application from which we will be downloading metadata.  This is accessed from the applications function.

https://docs.oracle.com/en/cloud/saas/enterprise-data-management-cloud/edmra/op-v1-applications-get.html

When executing this function, the JSON object return includes all applications that exist in EDMCS (including those archived). So the JSON needs to be iterated to find the record that relates to the application from which metadata needs to be exported.  In this case, the name of the application is unique and can be used to locate the appropriate record.  Next, we need to query the JSON object to get the actual dimension id (circled in red).  The dimension ID is used in subsequent calls to actually export the dimension.

Great, now we have the dimension ID. Next, we need to execute the REST API call to export the dimension.

Automated Metadata 1.docx

https://docs.oracle.com/en/cloud/saas/enterprise-data-management-cloud/edmra/op-v1-dimensions-dimensionid-export-download-post.html

You will notice that when you access this POST method, the dimension ID from the previous step is required:

/epm/rest/v1/dimensions/{dimensionId}/export/download

The JSON object returned from this execution contains minimal information. It simply provides the URL to the next required REST API execution which will provide the status of the execution.

Automated Metadata 2.docx

With this information, we can check the status of the export using the jobRuns function

https://docs.oracle.com/en/cloud/saas/enterprise-data-management-cloud/edmra/op-v1-jobruns-jobrunid-get.html

The JSON object returned here provides us the status of the export invoked in the prior step (in yellow) as well as a URL to the actual file to download which is our last step in the process.

Automated Metadata 3.docx

Once the export job is complete, the files can be streamed using the URL provided by the REST execution in the prior step.

https://docs.oracle.com/en/cloud/saas/enterprise-data-management-cloud/edmra/op-v1-files-temp-fileid-get.html

And there you have it, a fully automated solution to download metadata to flat files from EDMCS. Those files are then provided to the existing automation routine and our end-to-end process is truly complete.

And for my next trick…let’s explore some of the different REST API tools that are available to help you in your journey with the EPM REST APIs.

 

Troubleshooting Cloud Data Management Metadata Load Errors

In my last post, I highlighted a solution that was recently deployed for a customer that leveraged Enterprise Data Management Cloud Service (EDMCS), Financial Data Quality Management Enterprise Edition (FDMEE), and Cloud Data Management (CDM) to create an automated metadata integration process for both Planning and Budgeting Cloud Service (PBCS) and Financial Close and Consolidation Cloud Service (FCCS). In this post, I want to take a bit of a deeper dive into the technical build and share some important learnings.

Cloud Data Management introduced the ability to load metadata from a flat file to the Oracle EPM Cloud Services in the 17.11 patch. This functionality provides customers the ability to leverage a common platform for loading both data and metadata within the Cloud.  Equally important, CDM allows metadata to be transformed using its familiar mapping functionality.

As noted, this customer deployed both PBCS and FCCS. Within the PBCS application, four plan types are active while FCCS has the default two plan types.  A design decision was made for EDMCS to create a single custom application type that would store the metadata for both cloud applications.  This decision was not reached without significant thought as well as counsel with Oracle development.  While the pros and cons of the decision are outside the scope of this post, the choice to use a custom application registration in EDMCS ensured that metadata was input a single time but still fed to both cloud applications.  As a result of the EDMCS design decision, a single metadata file (per dimension) was supplied with properties necessary to support each plan type.

CDM leverages its 23 “dimensions” to store metadata information for processing. Exactly like data, metadata is imported using an import format into the CDM relational repository.  Each field from a metadata file is aligned to a CDM dimension field.  The CDM Account dimension always represents the target application member name and the CDM Entity dimension represents the parent of the member.  All other fields can be aligned to any of the remaining 21 dimensions.  CDM Attribute dimensions can be utilized in the import and mapping process but are not available for exporting to the cloud application.  This becomes an important constraint especially in a multi-plan type deployment.  These 21 fields can be used to store any of the properties required to successfully load metadata to the target plan type.

Let’s consider this case study for a moment. The PBCS application has four plan types.  If a process were to be built to load all plan types from a single CDM data load rule, then we would not be able to have more than five plan type specific attributes or properties because we would not have enough CDM fields/dimensions to store the relevant information.  This leads to an important design approach.  Instead of a single CDM data load rule to load all plan types, a data load rule was created for each plan type.  This greatly increased the number of metadata properties and attributes that could be loaded by CDM and ensured that future growth could be accommodated without a redesign of the integration process.

It is important to understand that CDM utilizes the Planning Outline Load Utility (OLU) to actually perform the metadata load to the cloud application. The OLU loads metadata using merge (yes Planning experts, I realize that I am not discovering fire) which is important to understand especially when processing multiple metadata loads for a single application.  When loading metadata, there are certain properties that are Application level.  I like to think of these as being global.  Additionally, there are plan type specific attributes that can align (or not align) to the application level value/setting.  I like to think of these as local.

Why is this important? Well when loading a metadata file, if certain global properties are excluded from the metadata load file, the local properties (if specified) are utilized to default the global properties. Since metadata is loading using merge, this only becomes problematic when a new member is being added to the outline.

In this particular example, an alternate hierarchy with shared members was specified in one of the plan types. The storage property of the alternates was obviously set as Shared; however, when attempting the metadata load, the following error was encountered:

A Base Member cannot be changed to a Shared Member.

After much investigation (details to follow), I discovered that the global property should also be included in the metadata load.

While CDM utilizes the OLU to load metadata, it does not provide as much verbosity in the error information as the PBCS web interface (which also uses OLU) when loading metadata. Below is an example of the error in the CDM process log.  As a tangent, I’d love to check the logs without needing to open a Service Request.  Maybe Oracle will build an enhancement that allows that in the future (hint, hint, wink, wink to my friends at Oracle).

Baha Mar - Error Handling 1

So where do I go from here? Well, what do we know about CDM loading metadata to the cloud application?  We know that CDM uses the OLU to load a flat file generated by CDM.  Bingo!  The metadata file output by CDM is a good starting point.  That file is in the Outbox of the CDM application and can be downloaded in several different ways – CDM Import process (get creative folks), CDM process details, or EPM Automate.  Now we have the metadata file and can test to determine if the error is caused by CDM or the metadata itself.  It’s all about ruling out variables.  So, we take the metadata file and import it manually within the PBCS web interface and are able to replicate the error.  But now we have an important new data point – the line number from the metadata file that is causing the error.

Baha Mar - Error Handling 2

Now that we have actionable information, we can review each property and start isolating and eliminating different variables. We determined that this error was only occurring for new alternate hierarchy parents being added to the outline.  As a test, we added the global storage property and voila, the metadata load completed successfully.  Face palm!

Maybe this would have been obvious to folks with a lot of Planning experience, but there are plenty of folks learning the intricacies of Planning and Essbase (including our friends converting from HFM to FCCS), so I wanted to share a lesson learned in my journey of metadata integration using CDM.

CDM functionality for metadata represents two of the three primary operations of ETL. In my next post, we’ll dive deeper into how the extract component of ETL was accomplished to provide a seamless end- to-end ETL solution for metadata.

Cloud Data Management (CDM) and Financial Data Quality Management Enterprise Edition (FDMEE): A Case Study in Working Together

Why buy Financial Data Quality Management Enterprise Edition (FDMEE) when Cloud Data Management (CDM) is free?  As outlined in my recent white paper – FDMEE vs. Cloud Data Management – there are myriad factors that can drive the decision.  This blog post highlights how one customer gained a highly flexible and automated solution for data and master data management with an on-premise deployment of FDMEE in conjunction with Cloud Data Management.

This customer adopted a pure Cloud strategy as it relates to Enterprise Performance Management (EPM) procuring subscriptions to Planning and Budgeting Cloud Service (PBCS), Financial Close & Consolidation Cloud Service (FCCS), and Account Reconciliation Cloud Service (ARCS).  A diverse business, the customer has many unique operational systems with varying formats and charts of accounts.  So far, no reason why Cloud Data Management (CDM) can’t handle this requirement, right?  This is what CDM does – uses import formats and maps to consume and transform data – right?  Sure, but with caveats.  Notice that I used the word consume and not extract.  CDM does not provide the ability to link with on-premise systems to extract data.  Additionally, flat file data extracts that lack a consistent structure often cannot be natively consumed by CDM.

In this case, data needs to be loaded each day from numerous sources to support daily operational reporting.  The systems are a blend of on-premise, hosted, and Cloud applications.  The customer requirement dictated that any on-premise system should be connected directly to eliminate the need for a flat file extract to be generated daily.  Additionally, the hosted and Cloud applications are very industry specific and, in some cases, provided by very niche vendors.  The ability to modify extract formats was cost prohibitive or simply not supported.  As a result, several of these data feeds were not consumable by CDM without preprocessing/modification.

In light of the above requirements, the customer procured and deployed FDMEE on-premise.  The power of FDMEE allows a solution to be deployed that provides a direct connection to multiple on-premise systems as well as consume the flat file extracts from hosted and Cloud applications including Excel files (not in the required FDMEE/CDM format) and XML.  Because FDMEE on-premise supports scripting, we were able to greatly enrich the data integration cycle with full end-to-end automation including FTP downloading of hosted data, enhancement of the data integration cycle to detect data mapped to members not yet in PBCS or FCCS, dynamically setting substitution variables based on the processing day, running calculations in PBCS, and sending email status alerts to outline the success or failure of a data load cycle.

Although I am a huge FDMEE advocate, I recognize the value of Cloud Data Management and the benefits it provides in a case like this one.  This customer was one of just three participants in the Oracle Enterprise Data Management Cloud Service (EDMCS) program.  This means that they were able to use the software before it was publicly available – otherwise known as GA.  To participate in this program, one must recognize the absence of certain features and functions with the software.  The program allows the customer (and partner) to offer Oracle development and product management valuable input about the software and in some ways drive what features are prioritized within the product roadmap.

EDMCS currently lacks native connections to FCCS, but this will change over time.  So how does CDM help with loading metadata to FCCS?  In a recent update to CDM, Oracle included the ability to import a flat file into CDM and load metadata to a registered target application such as PBCS or FCCS.  John Goodwin gives a detailed overview of the technical setup.

FDMEE and CDM have come together in this case to provide a fully automated data integration process and an automated master data integration process.  Within EDMCS, a Custom application type was created.  The required properties for FCCS were built and attached to the multiple dimensions being mastered, and flat file exports were generated for FCCS.  We knew we were going to use CDM to manage the master data load process, but we had a decision to make – do we leverage EPM Automate or FDMEE as our automation hub?

We chose FDMEE.  Why?  Simply because a lot of automation assets had already been developed in FDMEE that could readily be reused for this process including execution of EPM Automate commands, a framework for leveraging the REST API (for PBCS and FCCS), and email alerting.  Additionally, we found the capabilities of EPM Automate to be somewhat limited.

For example, when you execute a CDM data load rule from EPM Automate, the process ID associated with the execution is not returned.  Why is that important?  Because in the event of a failure, I’d want to download the process log and attach it to the email so the user has information to address the issue.  Could I use the ListFiles command of EPM Automate to get the process log? Possibly, but it doesn’t account for potential concurrency, and I am not doing my job as a consultant if I build a process that can’t handle concurrent operations.  For reasons such as these, we leveraged EPM Automate when possible and the REST API as needed, and we wrapped it all together with an FDMEE process that could be executed on a scheduled basis or on demand simply by using the Script Execution functionality.

Let’s review the end-to-end solution.  In EDMCS, metadata is maintained for PBCS and FCCS.  The metadata is extracted to a flat file (.csv) after maintenance is completed and saved to a network folder.  From FDMEE, the master data integration process is initiated to upload the metadata files to FCCS and PBCS.  Cloud Data Management data load rules are initialized to process the metadata extracts.  In the event of an error, the CDM process log is downloaded.  Finally, an email is generated to alert the administrator of the data integration process status.

There you have it – EDMCS, FDMEE, and CDM working in concert to provide a seamless and elegant solution to data and master data integration for a customer that adopted a Cloud EPM strategy.  If you want to learn how you can enhance your Oracle EPM integration processes, contact us and we’ll be happy to discuss your options.