We’ve Got You Covered: Producing Flat-File Extracts out of Cloud Data Management

As an EPM Administrator or Implementation Specialist, we have all had that moment when someone comes to us and asks for the dreaded extract out of an Enterprise Performance Management (EPM) application.  Depending on the system combination (Hyperion Financial Management (HFM), Planning, etc.) and the file layout specifications, this can be tricky.  Layer in the concept of a Cloud application, and things have now gotten real!

In an on-premise installation of Financial Data Quality Management Enterprise Edition (FDMEE), we could use scripting within a “custom application” to build an end-to-end approach for delivering a flat-file extract for third party consumption.  With the release of version 19.06, Oracle has further enhanced this concept and brought it to Cloud Data Management (CDM). The Cloud application now provides the ability to design and produce a text file for downstream consumption in Oracle Cloud products (PCMCS, EPBCS, FCCS).  WHOA!

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The Setup

I recently busted out the functionality and this is what I have discovered:  It’s crazy simple!

  1. Create a text file with your defined headers

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  1. Create a target application and set your settings

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3.  Create an import format

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  1. Create a Location & DLR

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  1. Create the desired Maps
  2. Run the Data Load Rule

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It is that simple!  CDM produces a file that looks similar to this:

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It can PIVOT!?

As crazy as it sounds, it can even pivot the data!  I find this extremely helpful as it is a common request to have twelve months of data in column format.  CDM leverages the PIVOT command of the database for this process and creates the pivot file with ease and efficiency.

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What does it do behind the scenes?

Behind the scenes, CDM appears to run a standard import and validation of the data, but it leverages a different set of workflow instructions.  The process does not consider unmapped items which are left as blank fields in the output.

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It also does not permanently store any data in the CDM repository unless you want it to.  The documentation can be easily misinterpreted because you will see “fish,” but no data is stored (more on this later).  A quick review of the process details log shows that all the work is done in the “tDataSeg_T” table.  This is the “temporary working” table of Data Management, and it is cleared after/before each new run for optimal performance.  Since the data is never moved out of this table, it is never retained.  Even the export process that produces the output file pulls from the temporary table.

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A review of the Documentation shows that there are 3 main supported types for processing:

  • Simple (the option selected here) – Does all the work in tDataSeg_T and does not retain any data or archive maps. Although, be warned, it does retain the process details and “fish” status which can look a bit strange.

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  • Full No Archive – Data is retained in tDataSeg only after the import step. Data is deleted after the export.
  • Full – All data is retained. Full process flows are supported (check rules, drill down, etc.).

That’s great, but my file is stuck in the Cloud!

Not really…let’s think this through in a workflow process.  When using Cloud applications, we might have an automation wrapper or a larger workflow process.  If not, we are using the general user interface (GUI), and we can access the file in two ways:

  1. Data File Explorer
  2. Process Details -> Download File option

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If we are using a more automated approach, we just need to include additional steps to:

  1. Monitor the data load rule for completion
  2. Verify the status of that completion (do not proceed forward if it failed; do something different)
  3. Confirm that the file was created
  4. Download the file that was created
  5. Continue the automated routine

In Summary…

It is simple to produce a file using Data Management in the EPM Cloud products.  This is a welcomed change that further enhances the product lines by delivering on client needs.  This allows us to build a simplified Cloud solution that was previously only on-premise.

If you need more information or have questions about this topic, email us at infosolutions@alithya.comSubscribe to receive notifications about new posts.  Follow Alithya on social media for the latest information about EPM, ERP, and Analytics solutions to meet your business needs.

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Hyperion Financial Management: Zero View and Default View Settings

One of the most common areas of confusion in Hyperion Financial Management (HFM) has been the Scenario application setting for the Default View and Zero View.  Peering back into the history of Hyperion Solutions, you will find this setting has existed in all the Consolidation products, such as Hyperion Enterprise’s “missing values” setting under Categories.  They are not new features and are a fundamental to HFM.

ZeroViewForAdj and ZeroViewForNonadj

There are two ZeroView settings in HFM.  The ZeroViewForNonadj is a setting which applies to the <Entity Currency> Value dimension.   The second is the ZeroViewForAdj which applies a setting to the <Entity Curr Adjs> Value dimension member.

The derived data that results from the ZeroView settings commonly appears in HFM as a slightly grey numeric value, as opposed to a black display found with standard data.

Before we explain what it does, let’s talk about why we need it.

Part of Hyperion Financial Management’s financial intelligence is its Account Types.  These types help to manage data flowing through the chart of accounts and support variance reporting.

  • Revenue
  • Expense
  • Asset
  • Liability
  • Balance
  • Flow
  • GroupLabel
  • Currency
  • BalanceRecurring

The Revenue, Expense and Flow Account types are referred to as “flow” accounts and tend to support Profit and Loss reporting.  As such, they are supported by the View dimension.  The View dimension allows data to be viewed, keyed or loaded as YTD or Periodic amounts.  Data entered as periodic sales of $1000 to all months would allow users to view December as Periodic $1000 or YTD $12,000.

Example 1:

The ZeroView setting informs the HFM Scenario how to handle data for a flow account when no data is loaded to a Period.  No data is not a zero; it is a blank, non-existent value.

Example 2:

If data was loaded from your source system for Jan as $1000, how should HFM calculate Feb? There are two options using the ZeroView settings which are YTD or Periodic.  The first option is the YTD setting for the ZeroViewForNonadjs attribute.

Choosing the ZeroView setting as YTD, HFM will fill the period following with a derived value as zero YTD.

Example 3 ZeroView as YTD:

Recall that Flow accounts can be viewed as Periodic or YTD, what does Feb look like as Periodic?  If there is $1000 YTD in Jan and zero YTD in Feb, there must have been a change in periodic activity.  Therefore, the Feb Periodic value would be $-1000 to arrive at YTD zero.

Example 4 ZeroView as YTD:

The second option is to set the ZeroView settings as Periodic.  This setting addresses the same properties of flow type accounts.  In this instance, the following period will have a zero applied as a Periodic zero, which is the activity.  This setting is common on the Budget and Forecast Scenarios.  The data result is the entry flows through all the periods because the YTD value is derived from the Periodic activity.

Example 5 ZeroView as Periodic:

Example 6 ZeroView as Periodic:

How does one determine which setting is correct for their application?  Typically, we analyze how the data load file is constructed.  For example, for flow accounts that may be adjusted to zero, are they included in the file?  Does a periodic version of the file supply zero items as the year-to-date negative offset? The most common setting is to set the ZeroView as YTD for Actual data loads.

A good example why we would set the ZeroView to YTD in Actual would be if data was re-classed month-to-month or a new account is used.  In the example below, a different account is used in Feb compared to the data supplied in Jan.  The ZeroView setting as YTD will automatically assume the Feb amount is to be YTD zero.

Example 7 ZeroView as YTD:

If the Scenario was set to Periodic for the ZeroView, the application would have incorrect results for Feb as 2000.  The data would flow through all the Periods, and in this case, the Sales account should be zero for Feb.  The original account would require a -1000 Periodic or “0” YTD entries to clear the value in Feb on account Sales.

Example 8 ZeroView as Periodic:

The ZeroViewForAdjs setting applies to how HFM Journal entries will function for missing data and how they affect future periods.

For Journal adjustments we see the same impact on the data within the <Entity Curr Adjs> Value member.  The YTD setting will essentially reverse the Journal in the following period by applying the YTD offset to the Journal.

Example 9 ZeroView as YTD:

In cases were a prior period is being adjusted, the YTD setting will keep the YTD values of future Period, such as Feb, constant.  As an example, if the original value were 1000 in Jan and 1000 in Feb, the Feb YTD amount would be 2000.  A journal posted to Jan would impact the Jan results, but the Feb YTD amount of 2000 would not change.  In the example above, what is adjusted is the Periodic amount from 1000 to 500.  Therefore, to see the impact on all periods, the Journal would need to be created and posted in all periods going forward.

Journal adjustments with the ZeroView setting for Journals as Periodic will allow the impact of the Journal to affect the YTD results in the future periods.  Because of this, to reverse the affect in a future period a reversing Journal entry is required.

Example 10 ZeroView as Periodic:

Therefore, when viewing data within HFM as a YTD or Periodic view, the grey offset values are the result of your Scenario settings for ZeroViewForNonadjs or ZeroViewForAdjs.  These amounts impact your YTD and Periodic results in Local and Translated amounts.

Default View

The Default view determines what View will be applied to the “<Scenario View>”.  When opening a Grid, form or report, this is the default member that will display.

Because of this, it is important when writing reports or comparing data, a specific view be chosen.  The “<Scenario View>” results will vary by the design of each Scenario.

The default view also is a concern for Rules in HFM.  This setting sets the basis of calculations.

As an example, if there was a Rule that simply called for “estimated bonus” to be a percent of “sales” after we attained our goal of $1000.00, the calculation would vary by Default View on Scenarios.

In the example, the YTD Scenario will calculate a result because it is calculating Rules off the YTD value of $1500. The Periodic Scenario does not calculate the Rule because it is driven off the Periodic value of $500.

Careful attention to Rules development and the utilization of the Dynamic Sub Routine in rules can help to minimize issues caused by differences in the Default View settings.