Demystify the Balance Dimension in Profitability and Cost Management

Management Ledger models, whether Hyperion Profitability and Cost Management (HPCM) or Profitability and Cost Management Cloud Service (PCMCS), have been around for a few years, but I still receive emails asking for help with figuring out where the results are coming from. This request is often related to a lack of understanding of the Balance dimension. Here are some key pieces of information regarding this system dimension, how it works, how it should be used when defining allocations and integration jobs, and how to leverage it to troubleshoot your allocations.

Before we have a look at each member within this dimension, let’s go over some basic rules that govern the creation of an HPCM or PCMCS Management Ledger (ML) application:

  1. All HPCM or PCMCS ML applications must contain just one dimension named Balance
  2. Members and their properties cannot be edited or removed.
  3. You don’t need to import a file in order to load/setup the Balance dimension; members are created automatically when deploying an application for the first time.
  4. You can choose to rename the Balance dimension (translate it into another language, for example) when you first set up the application in PCMCS.

For the most part, the Balance dimension members are quite easy to follow and understand, but familiarity with usage guidelines helps to avoid issues during development and supports troubleshooting.

Demystifying the Balance Dimension in PCM - Image 1

  • Input — Used to store data input/pre-allocated data sets, whether these are pool or driver data sets. Data is generally loaded against this member in combination with the NoRule member. Input can be populated through custom calculations, but it is generally advised to keep it dedicated to valid data loads/input rather than for storing calculated or allocated results.
  • Adjustment In —Adjustment In can be used for manual adjustments to the Input data prior to running allocations. In this case, the Adjustment In data will be loaded against the NoRule member. Any manually submitted data on the Adjustment member against a Rule ID member may be eliminated during the subsequent data loads and calculations. Adjustment In can also be used during custom calculations to store intermediary values or calculated driver data.
  • Adjustment Out —Same usage as for Adjustment In, but with a negative data value.
  • Allocation In — This member will be populated against the Destination or Target intersection for the allocation rule.
  • Allocation Out —This member will be populated against the Source intersection of the allocation rule and the corresponding Rule ID member, or against a predefined “Offset” intersection that is custom defined for a given rule.
  • Allocation Offset Amount — Displays an amount that further reduces an Allocation In member, if one was used in addition to the Allocation Out. I have provided an example of how this member is populated and used in a lower section of this post.
  • Net Change — represents the total change for a given intersection, regardless of alternate offset actions.
  • Net Balance – sum of Input (initial data loaded) and any Net Changes made to the same intersection.
  • Remainder — Displays the difference between Allocation In and Allocation Out plus Allocation Offset Amount, if any.
  • Balance — The amount resulting when adjustments, allocations, and offsets are considered.

Rules assign funds to destinations based on the way you have defined the allocation logic (member selections, sequencing, concurrency, etc.). “Allocations in” and “allocations out” are being generated upon executing the calculations of the Profitability model. Each pair of adjustments and allocations (the “in” and the “out”) should result in a zero sum in order to balance the transaction. The Input member is affected by each adjustment and allocation. The difference between what was taken from Input and what remains at the end of an allocation will be accounted for in the Remainder.

The Remainder member is the source of your allocations, not the Net Balance member, as most would think.  Remainder takes into consideration alternate offsets and ensures we do not perform a double booking or a double allocation of the same data source, regardless of where the offset was applied.

To further explain the Balance dimension usage, I have used an example from the Bikes default application BksML30, which can be deployed into PCMCS through a few clicks.

The original application had only one adjustment Rule populating the Adjustment In member. I have copied that rule and reused it to demonstrate the same usage for the Adjustment Out member. Remember the adjustment out aggregation operator is still +, so if you want to offset data sets, you must use the appropriate signage for your data; in other words, negate the result either via a multiplication with -1 or by simply adding a – to the formula.

The new ruleset contents will look like this:

Demystifying the Balance Dimension in PCM - Image 2

Our initial data set is loaded on the Input/No Rule combination for the two accounts – Rent and Utilities – on the intersection with Corporate Entity.

The data adjustments are stored against Adjustment In and Adjustment Out.

Demystifying the Balance Dimension in PCM - Image 3

In order to further illustrate how to correctly follow the allocation process, I split the original Reassignment rule into 2 rules, each dedicated to its own account. I also updated the metadata by adding two new Account siblings to Rent and Utilities as offsets for each account.

Alternate offsets are simply intersections of members where you would like to store the offset data point, if it should differ from the source of the allocation.

The Remainder member demonstration is connected to the usage of alternate offsets, and before we go into the details of the numerical example, I would like to list out a few rules for setting up alternate offsets:

  • Alternate offsets are available for selection only in standard allocation rules. For Custom calculations, your Offset custom calc would have to be pointed to the appropriate “alternate” target.
  • All dimensions, including the ones predefined in the rule context, are repeated in the Offset screen as soon as you select “Alternate Offset Location.” You must select a single base level member for at least one dimension.
  • There is no “Same As Source” (SAS) option for offsets. The dimensions that must be offset on the Source intersections can be left blank in the Offset screen selections.
  • If each source member selection has its own offset, you will have to split the rule up into as many granular rules as needed in order to cover the individual offset selection. For example, if you have 6 accounts, each with its own offset account equivalent, you will have to create 6 standard allocation rules to create the individual offset selection for each account.

Going back to the numerical example and the usage of the Offset tab, in the update rule I have selected the below member intersections:

Demystifying the Balance Dimension in PCM - Image 4

The Source account was Rent, target is “Same as Source” (SAS), and the alternate offset account is FACOffset_Rent.

After the rules are executed, we will see the results below; focus on the Allocation Offset Amount member and the Allocation Out Member.

Even though the offset was applied to an alternate account for both Rent and Utilities, the allocation engine correctly identifies the Remainder of these two accounts as being 0.

  1. The first step behind the scenes is for the allocation to correctly distribute the data to the target intersections.
  2. The second step is to perform the offset on the intersection specified by the user, if different from the source intersection.
  3. The third step is to copy the Allocation Out value onto the Source Intersection members, on allocation Offset Amount member. This final step is performed via a custom calculation embedded in the PCMCS generated scripts which ensures there will be no double counting of pool data.

So even though we “moved” data from the Rent account, Corporate Entity, to other Entities, on the same target Account, the offset was performed on an alternate member. This allows us to create a report with Rent (Input), Rent (Allocation In) and FACOffset_Rent (Allocation out).

This is not a typical example of how alternate offsets are used from a functional standpoint, but it helps explain the mechanics behind the scenes. This alternate offset option is mostly used in cases where a Bill Out account and a Chargeback account will differ and allows users to trace which portion of a chargeback account is coming from different source accounts.

The final goal of an allocation is to generate a Remainder member with a value of 0. This ensures the total allocation of a pool data set, whether this was loaded or received from prior allocation steps. If the Remainder member has a positive value, then it is indicating that you have not fully utilized your pool data. If the Remainder member has a negative value, then you have overutilized your pool data which may be, in some cases, intentional.

Demystifying the Balance Dimension in PCM - Image 5

In situations where you will not give access to the PCMCS ML application to users who need to understand the various components of a data point flowing through the allocation steps, due to licensing costs or other considerations, the usage of alternate offsets throughout your allocation flow might be helpful.

When talking about reporting out of PCMCS ML, our clients always emphasize simplicity, and we often get requests to remove the Rule and Balance dimensions from final reporting solutions, to cancel the noise and give finance users solely the core information. In such situations, the usage of alternate offsets has proved beneficial as these finance users can still follow the flow and components of a cost without having to deal with the rule by rule detail. If further investigation is necessary, this can be pursued within the PCMCS ML model itself rather than in the external reporting solution.

If you need further help with figuring out the purpose and usage of the Balance dimension within PCMCS, email us at infosolutions@alithya.com. Our PCM Center of Excellence team is ready to share leading practices and industry-specific solutions that accelerate your ROI and expand the capabilities of your chosen profitability software.

A Cloud vs. On-Premise Comparison for Profitability: All You Need to Know

In a previous blog post, the history of Hyperion Profitability and Cost Management (HPCM) was discussed along with which modules made it to the Cloud. If you are after a more clear-cut comparison between Cloud and on-premise, the below table should fit the bill. Tables generally cannot provide all the needed context, yet they are, at times, the best starting point to understand the benefits and capabilities of one solution compared to another.  The below PCMCS vs. HPCM table is not exhaustive, and if you have questions on any of the items covered, email us and we will provide further details.

PCMCS 12-11 Image 1

Choosing between on-premise and Cloud depends on which factors are the most significant barring the overall licensing cost.

Allocations and data assignments cannot have “If” statements attached to them in the on-premise version of the software – a feature fundamental to supporting Tax transfer pricing capabilities.

The cross-dimension mapping is a functionality that is not available in HPCM. This mapping ensures the assignment of data sets to the same ID/name across multiple dimensions by using the “Same as Source but Different Dimension” option within PCMCS to support intercompany activities. This feature alone, or the lack of it, may significantly impact the design of an application and the overall complexity of allocation flows.

Features available in the Cloud but not yet released in on-premise solutions could tip the scale to favor the Cloud option when all other aspects surrounding a Cloud implementation no longer appear to be as pressing. Out-of-the-box content such as overnight backups, full application, and data restores that are at the business users’ fingertips – not to mention the reporting and dashboarding included in the Cloud version – are all differentiators of a product that enables business users to control their allocation process and methodology from its inception.

While there may be exceptions to the trend where on-premise solutions can have advantages (modules not available in the Cloud, for example) and, therefore, represent the best option at a given moment in time, the reality is that the future is being developed in the Cloud and for the Cloud, and at some point the shift will most likely no longer be an option, but a necessity.

If you need help making a decision with an existing implementation or you would like more details about HPCM vs. PCMCS to make a better informed decision, email us at infosolutions@alithya.com. Our PCM Center of Excellence team is ready to share leading practices and industry-specific solutions that accelerate the ROI and expand the capabilities of your chosen software.

Worry No More! Say Goodbye to Pain and Frustration when Submitting Service or Enhancement Requests with Oracle for PCMCS

While nobody likes submitting Service Requests (SR) on the Oracle support site, this is a necessary task that we must get comfortable with, whether our applications are on-premise or in the Cloud.  After 12 years of consulting, I can say that I have seen or pursued many wrong ways of submitting an SR which, in turn, yields results along similar lines – a lot of back-and-forth emailing with Oracle’s support staff, personal frustration, misinformation, and most importantly – time wasted on all sides.

Worry no more!  Here is a list of things you can do to avoid further pain and frustration when submitting Service Requests or Enhancement Requests with Oracle for Profitability and Cost Management Cloud Service (PCMCS).

  1. Where do I start when submitting SRs and ERs for PCMCS?

You can still use the generic Oracle Support website to open either an SR or an Enhancement Request (ER) with Oracle for Cloud applications, but the right way to do this is to first gain access to the Oracle Cloud Support website which looks slightly different and has a couple of new fields to complete. The email associated with the Oracle account should be the same email that has access to specific Cloud subscriptions.

Standard Oracle Support website

PCMCS Image 1

Cloud Support website

PCMCS Image 2

  1. Provide feedback

Login in to the Cloud application for which you want to create the SR or ER, and once you are logged in to PCMCS, navigate to your user name (top right) and select “Provide Feedback.” A new screen will appear enabling you to highlight the area of concern to provide context for the reason you are submitting the SR or ER.

Provide details around the area of concern. This gives context to the issue at hand and creates a reference for future troubleshooting. For example, if the issue is related to one specific Rule, ensure that the last screen open before you click on Provide Feedback is on the rule itself, or open to the job library listing the execution of the rule. You will only be able to highlight areas on the last screen open before launching the “Provide Feedback” screen.  The details you provide here will not automatically be copied into your SR. If you want to describe the issue in detail within this section, you can copy the same text within the SR itself – save it locally before submitting the feedback.

  1. Options for your feedback.

After you submit your feedback, a new panel will come up and will contain the following 3 sections:

  1. Environment: a listing of your Browser, Platform, Version, Locale, Resolution, Time zone, Cookies enabled (Y/N), URL of the instance, and the User Agent. You do not have to fill in anything in this section. All information is filled in for you.
  2. Plugins: a listing of enabled plugins, if any. You do not have to fill in anything in this section. All information is filled in for you.
  3. Confirm Application snapshot submission: this is the only section where you must provide input.

PCMCS Image 5You have a choice of Yes / No – depending on how comfortable you feel about Oracle using your daily maintenance snapshot for regression testing in upcoming releases. Giving Oracle access to your maintenance snapshots means you are agreeing to them using the model and any related data for their testing going forward. If your hierarchy structures and data are not sensitive, then you may choose to select “Yes.”  My personal preference is to select “No” and provide the static/current moment in time archived snapshot within the SR . When the SR is closed, the contents of said snapshot will be archived and not used for further regression testing.

  1. Generate a Diagnostic Report (UDR) ID

When clicking the “Submit” button on this screen, a unique alphanumeric reference is generated. This reference will be required when submitting an SR or ER on the Oracle Cloud Support website. Write down or, preferably, copy and save this UDR string of characters on your workstation in a txt file.

  1. Log in to the Oracle Cloud Support website and proceed with opening a new Cloud SR/ER.

Select the “Create Service Request” button on the lower left-hand side of your screen.

PCMCS Image 6

Select “Service Type” from the drop-down list of available Cloud services to which your user has access.

PCMCS Image 7

Once you have selected “Oracle Hyperion Profitability and Cost Management Cloud Service,” a listing of all available instances will be displayed in the new “Service Name” section:

PCMCS Image 8

Make sure you select the appropriate “Service Name” with the instance where you generated the related UDR (see previous steps).

Add “Problem Type” and select based on the type closest to your issue:

PCMCS Image 9

The above choices will not trigger related content or a list of options – this is merely to ensure that the ticket goes to the appropriate team during the investigation process.

In the “Problem Summary” section, reference the Cloud product for which you are creating the SR or ER. This will be the subject of your ticket, and it will help administer and keep track of multiple tickets at the same time.

  1. Attach all System Reports available for your PCMCS app.

To avoid multiple back and forth email exchanges with the Oracle Support staff, provide them with all the available information. Here is a current list of all available reports for troubleshooting PCMCS applications.

  1. Execution statistics for the last model / allocation execution connected to the SR – if SR is related to calc performance, calc troubleshooting or rule setup. (PDF or XLS format preferable)
  2. Program Documentation (with details; not with aliases) (XLS or PDF format preferable)
  3. Dimension Statistics (PDF format preferable)
  4. POV Statistics (PDF or XLS format preferable)

All these reports can be generated from PCMCS – Navigator menu – System reports.

PCMCS Image 10

  1. Attach the Diagnostic report

From the “Navigator” Menu, select “Application,” click on the drop-down in “Actions” and select “Export Supplemental Diagnostics.” This report is very useful to the development team troubleshooting your issue.

PCMCS Image 11

When selecting this report, a new job will be launched that can take anywhere between a couple of minutes to 20+ minutes, depending on the size of your application and the amount of logging involved.

An archive of the diagnostics reports will be generated in the File Explorer within the Application menu.  Some of the reports in this archive will be a repeat of the other reports mentioned in the previous step, but if you provide all this information simultaneously, the redundancy should not cause any issues. If you are not open to launching such process in your environment during business hours, and yet you still want to submit the SR in a timely fashion, you can skip this step and provide this report only upon request from Oracle Support staff.

  1. Error description

If you can replicate the error, capture each step via screenshots and save them in a Word doc. The earlier the support staff understands what you are dealing with, the faster the entire troubleshooting process will be completed.

Refer to menu options precisely as what they are called within PCMCS.

For example, to submit an SR or ER related to the Calculation Rules menu, refer to it as Calculation Rules – Rules Express Editing, as both names appear in the PCMCS menu.

PCMCS Image 12

  1. Establish the SR level appropriately.

There are 4 options to choose from, and you should choose based on urgency as well as level of importance.

PCMCS Image 13

Choose severity 1 and 2 only when applicable. You may be inclined to select such severity options so that your issue is resolved quickly, but use your own criteria to distinguish between something that is really a show stopper and something that is not. Time is of the essence for both you and the Oracle Development team.

When choosing severity 1, you will open your calendar for potential phone calls that can occur at any time, regardless of your time zone.

  1. My request is really an ER, not an SR.

If your SR is an Enhancement Request, provide a lot of supporting detail in the “Business Justification” section. Not doing so will delay the Enhancement Request submission by up to 2 weeks. If further business justification is requested, respond promptly to make things move along and ensure that your request makes it to the next patch release sooner rather than later.

Once an Enhancement Request is recorded, your SR will be updated with the ER ID (which will differ from the SR ID originally assigned the moment you submitted the ticket).  The original SR will be closed, and you can open a new SR quoting the ER ID 48 hours after the moment your request was accepted. The Support staff will confirm whether the ER will make it in the next monthly patch release.

  1. Bedside manners for SR/ER submitters.

Try to reduce the number of communications within the SR. Taking the above steps will get you closer to achieving a near-perfect SR submission. Be mindful about how to communicate efficiently. The higher the amount of back-and-forth communication, the more difficult it will be for the development team to follow the conversation trail and ensure efficient troubleshooting.

Whether you are a service provider or a PCMCS administrator who inherited an application at the end of a project implementation, we all tap the same Oracle Support resources which are, as are most things, finite. The more efficient your SR/ER submission is, the faster these resources provide a response with accurate and detailed troubleshooting steps. For any time-sensitive issues or further escalation, leverage your Oracle representative and your implementation partner. Their existing relationship with Oracle Product Management will help direct your query to the right resources and ensure your SR is not stuck because of lack of clarity regarding which team should own it. This will ensure that your SR/ER is fast-tracked to the appropriate team and given the right level of attention. For any critical issues you encounter with PCMCS or other Cloud subscriptions where there is no solution in sight, reach out to Alithya at infosolutions@alithya.com so that our team can provide a fast end effective assessment.

Key Features of EDMCS 18.10

Usually, when October rolls around each year, there are three things I am very excited about:

  1. The start of the NHL season
  2. Watching one of my favorite scary movies (Halloween ’78)
  3. Eating leftover Halloween candy for the next six months because we bought 200 pounds of it at Costco and only had 5 trick-or-treaters show up at our door

But this year, add #4 to the list: The October 18.10 release of Enterprise Data Management Cloud Service (EDMCS)! Trust me, this is a monster of a release (pun intended). This is the biggest release since 18.07 and here are some of the highlights:

  • New packaged adapter for Oracle Financials Cloud GL
  • Property Inheritance
  • Add Related Nodes Across Viewpoints
  • Download Viewpoint in Request Context
  • Request Load File Summary Statistics
  • Level Property
  • Metadata Deletion
  • Object Details Popup

Here are more details and insights on a few of these features:

Oracle Financials Cloud GL Adapter

This is a major adapter in terms of functionality. And like the packaged adapters for Planning and Budgeting Cloud Service (PBCS) and Enterprise Planning and Budgeting Cloud Service (EPBCS), you can create an EDMCS application for Oracle Financials Cloud GL using a standard wizard interface, identify a connected application or use a file interface, and reap the benefits of several built-in validations.

The registration process includes steps to identify basic settings (e.g. Active Languages, Active Trees, Multiple Active Tree Versions, and Max Depth), register multiple Segments and Trees, and add/modify/remove Financial Categories. From reviewing the Oracle EDMCS Administrator Guide, I identified at least 16 built-in validations for EDMCS applications based on the Oracle Financials Cloud GL Adapter. This is certainly a packaged adapter with a lot of “meat on its bones.”

Property Inheritance

For those who love Oracle Data Relationship Management (DRM), you likely used the inheritance features of that product extensively – whether it was the global, inheriting property definition or using functions like ParentPropValue(). Well now you have property inheritance in EDMCS.

Property inheritance is set during the Application Registration process by modifying custom properties within your dimension node types. The choices are “None” or “Positional” which work as you would expect. Inherited property values can be overwritten in a request for exception cases. The other feature I like is that inheritance supports Shared members for relationship-level properties, allowing a shared member to have a different inherited property value than its primary member.

NOTE: property inheritance is only available for EDMCS Custom applications. It is not available for EDMCS applications based on the PBCS, EPBCS, or Financial Cloud GL adapter.

Request Load File Summary Statistics

This nice little feature gives you immediate statistics and feedback as you load a Request File into EDMCS. The number of rows processed, loaded, and skipped are identified, and you can open the request file attached to the in-flight request to see details on why rows were skipped. This all occurs before you submit the request and provides helpful, proactive input as to the changes that will be processed in your request.

Key Features of EDMCS Image 1

Metadata Deletion

With 18.10, you can now delete custom properties and custom applications. This makes me happy, as I’m not ashamed to admit that as I learned EDMCS, I made plenty of mistakes in creating applications or properties that I could not un-do. Oh the shame! Instead, I had to resort to archiving the application to partially hide my guilt. But now you can delete those unwanted custom properties and applications. Hopefully, future releases will allow intelligent deletion of other “mistakes” involving data chain objects like node sets, hierarchy sets, and node types that are archived and no longer used/needed.

Object Details Popup

Another minor, but helpful feature. Hover your mouse over a viewpoint name/label, and a popup window will display the application and dimension being used in the viewpoint. Helpful to keep your bearings when you start to use maintenance views that span multiple EDMCS applications and dimensions.

Key Features of EDMCS Image 2

Conclusion

As you can see, 18.10 is a significant release and arguably the single largest release in terms of new features since EDMCS was introduced in January 2018.

The biggest feature? Definitely the new adapter for Oracle Financials Cloud GL applications. I recommend reviewing the Oracle EDMCS Administration Guide to understand the full power that comes with this adapter. It is quite interesting.

The feature I will use right away? Property inheritance. With my current project involving multiple Custom EDMCS applications, property inheritance is a welcomed feature that will significantly ease the maintenance of key properties throughout my maintenance views.

I’d love to hear any insights and feedback from you as we continue this crazy journey called EDMCS. And stay tuned for future blogs discussing new EDMCS functionality and lessons learned from current projects!

Missed our earlier blogs on EDMCS, Cloud Data Management, and REST API? Be sure to check them out:

Using Subscriptions with EDMCS

As an earlier blog mentioned, the 18.07 release of Enterprise Data Management Cloud Service (EDMCS) delivered one eagerly anticipated piece of functionality: Subscriptions! And do not fear – these subscriptions are useful and do not involve a 1-year subscription to the Fruit of the Month Club (not that there’s anything wrong with that).

This blog post dives deeper into this new functionality, describes how it works, and highlights some lessons learned from utilizing Subscriptions with a current project involving multiple EDMCS Custom applications supporting multiple Profitability and Cost Management Cloud Service (PCMCS) applications.

Why Are Subscriptions Important?

Subscriptions are a huge step towards true “mastering” of enterprise data assets within a single master data Cloud platform. With EDMCS, it is important to build deployment-specific applications configured to the dimensionality requirements of the target applications to most effectively use the packaged adapters, validations, and integration capabilities. But in many cases, you also need to share common hierarchies across applications and avoid duplicative (that’s my big word for today) maintenance. After all, why have a master data management tool if you still must perform maintenance in multiple places? That’s just silly.

The answer to this dilemma is Subscriptions. By implementing Subscriptions, requests submitted to a primary viewpoint will automatically generate parallel subscription requests to subscribing viewpoints to automatically synchronize your hierarchy changes across EDMCS applications.

Note

This comment is important: “automatically generate parallel subscription requests.” EDMCS will not update a target, or subscribing, viewpoint behind the scenes with no visibility or audit trail to what has occurred. A parallel Subscription request will be generated along with the Interactive request that will be visible in the Requests window, along with the full audit trail and details that you find in an Interactive request. Even better, the Subscription request will generate an email and attach a Request File of the changes.

Nerdy Details

Views and Viewpoints

The first thing to really think about is the View and Viewpoint design of your EDMCS applications. Subscriptions are defined at the Viewpoint level, so you need to identify the source and target viewpoint for your business situation. With my current project, I have multiple EDMCS applications supporting multiple PCMCS applications. While the dimensionality is similar across the applications, the hierarchies vary, especially with the alternate hierarchies. So, it has been important to isolate the “common” or shared structures that should be synchronized across applications into their own viewpoint so that a subscription mechanism can be created.

Node Type Converters

You will likely need to create a node type converter. If the source and target viewpoints do not share a common node type, you must create a node type converter for subscriptions to work. In my situation, I had already created node type converters since I wanted to compare common structures across EDMCS applications, so the foundation was there to readily implement subscriptions.

Permissions

To create a Subscription, the creator must have (at a minimum) View Browser permission to the source view, View Owner permission to the target view, and Data Manager permission to the target application.

The Subscription assignee (this is the user who will “submit” the subscription request) must have (at a minimum) View Browser permission to the source view and Data Manager permission to the target application.

Creating a Subscription

Once the foundation is in place in terms of viewpoints, node type converters, and permissions, the actual creation of a subscription is easy.

Inspect the target viewpoint (the viewpoint that is to receive the changes from a source viewpoint via subscription), navigate to the Subscriptions tab, and click Edit. From there you can select the source viewpoint, the request assignee, and enable Auto Submit if needed. Save the subscription and you are all set.

  • Currently, there is no capability to edit an existing subscription. You must delete and add a new subscription to effect a change.
  • Any validation errors for your subscription will appear on this dialog as well. These are documented nicely in the Oracle EDMCS administration guide.

Using Subscriptions with EDMCS Image 1

Auto-Submit and Email Notifications

Emails will be generated and sent to the Request Assignee, whether Auto-Submit is enabled or not. The email will include details such as the original request #, the subscription request #, and how many request items were processed or skipped.

Using Subscriptions with EDMCS Image 2

Note

  • Remember, the subscription request will have a Request File attached to it. View the request file attachment to see details on why specific request items were skipped.
  • The request file is not attached to the email itself, only to the request in EDMCS.

Lessons Learned

Like I mentioned earlier, the foundation is important to making subscriptions work. And it all boils down to design and ensuring the building blocks of that foundation are in place:

Design, Design, Design!

  • The importance of dimension, view, and viewpoint design cannot be overstated. For each dimension, evaluate the primary and alternate hierarchy content and identify what will be shared across dimensions or applications and what will be unique to each dimension and application.
  • Based on that analysis, carefully design your viewpoints to enable subscriptions across EDMCS applications for hierarchies that truly need “mastering.”
  • As early as possible, identify the EDMCS user population along with permission levels for applications and views. This is important to identify the appropriate “Request Assignee” for your Subscriptions. I recommend creating a security matrix identifying each user and the permissions each will have.
  • Without a clear and well thought out design, you will find yourself constantly re-doing your views and viewpoints which, in turn, will cause constant rework of your subscriptions. The “measure twice, cut once” adage certainly applies here!
  • I am a big proponent of standard, consistent naming conventions to improve the usability and end user experience. The same holds true for Subscriptions. Consider using a standard naming convention for your viewpoints so it is clear which viewpoints have a subscription. It’s not obvious – unless you Inspect the viewpoint – that a subscription exists.
    • One approach I’ve been using is to name my source and target viewpoints identically with a special tag or symbol at the end of the target viewpoint name to indicate a subscription is present. I’m sure there are other and probably better ideas, but I find the visual cue to be helpful.
    • Perhaps in the future, Oracle will display subscription details when you hover over a viewpoint name (hint hint).

Node Type Converters

  • Ensure you have node converters in place
  • Make sure your node type converters are mapping all required properties.
    • I ran into an issue where updates to one property in my source viewpoint were not being applied to my target viewpoint via subscription requests, but all other property updates worked fine. The reason? I had recently modified my App Registration and added this property to a dimension’s node type. But my node type converter had already been created and wasn’t mapping or recognizing the new property. Once I updated my node type converter, the problem was solved.

Troubleshooting

  • The request files attached to subscription requests are a valuable troubleshooting tool. Status codes and error messages are included in these Excel files that are extremely helpful to determine why your request was not auto-submitted.
  • Inspect the Subscriptions on your viewpoints. Any validation issues will be displayed and are easily addressed. Typical Subscription validation errors include:
    • The request assignee no longer has the correct permission levels
    • The viewpoint no longer is active
    • A node type converter is missing

Conclusion

I have been looking forward to the subscription functionality in EDMCS and am pleased with it so far. Subscriptions are easy to configure, can be configured to auto-submit if desired, and generate emails to remind the requester a request has occurred and to act if the request was not submitted or request items were skipped. EDMCS Subscriptions are a big step forward to enabling true mastering of your enterprise data management assets!

Patch Today! Don’t Delay! Best Reasons to Upgrade Your EPM System

Putting off that upgrade to 11.1.2.4? Cloud not whetting your appetite for patches? Patch today. Don’t delay!

“But we’re going to the Oracle EPM Cloud soon!” you say. You should maintain your patches anyway. With the recurring maintenance, updates, and patches available to the EPM Cloud products, expect the on-premise patches to contain similar updates. An upcoming conversion to Oracle EPM Cloud products may benefit from running the latest on-premise codelines.

If you have an existing on-premise installation of Oracle EPM System, be sure to maintain the latest EPM System Patch Set Updates every 3 to 6 months. Here are a few great reasons why:

New Features

Patches often contain reactive bug resolutions to known issues; however, we have also been seeing new functionality released in patches for 11.1.2.4.

You Own It

You already pay for it! As long as your Oracle Maintenance contract is current (very likely if you are reading this article), you’re already paying for access to patches. Why leave them unapplied? You are running legacy code when the latest version costs you nothing additional. Windows XP was a great OS, but we’ve got to keep up with the times.

Supportability

Maximize your success by reducing time to resolution on your issues. Should you submit a support request to the vendor, the first line of response to a ticket is often about current patch levels. Once provided, the subsequent reply frequently contains a recommendation to apply the latest Patch Set Updates (PSUs) to see if that fixes the issue. Annoying? Perhaps you’re a pessimist. Or have just been remiss with your patching. I’ve certainly changed my mind on the matter and can better side with them. The reason? Supporting the latest codeline is more efficient and effective for the vendor. Your problem may have already been addressed in a code fix. They can better and more quickly support you if they are troubleshooting the current release instead of legacy code.

Stability

In older versions, patches seem to come out on a haphazard schedule. Over the last few years, Oracle has regularly streamlined EPM System patch releases – typically releasing Patch Set Updates quarterly, which are different from Patch Set Exceptions. PSUs are a grouping of PSEs or fewer, more significant PSEs that get regression tested collectively by the vendor and are released under a singular patch. We’ve gained a much higher degree of confidence with this bulk model of PSUs. The organization of release schedule and bug fixes is more dependable and greatly appreciated. The PSU model provides less ambiguity on which patches to apply and brings greater stability to all customers.

Upgrade

Maybe it’s bigger than patching. Are you not on version 11.1.2.4 of your EPM System? Compliance with Enterprise IT requirements around browser version and operating systems is often impetus for an upgrade. But there are also plenty of compelling new software features, functions, conventions, and improvements in 11.1.2.4.

Operating System (OS) support for current platforms maximizes your investment and supportability. When 2.4 came out, many customers were forced to upgrade their older systems for compliance with the latest enterprise standards for server operating systems and/or client browser versions. Instead of being faced with an IT mandated technology upgrade, an upgrade on the business’ schedule is preferred.

What Kind of Effort is Involved?

The comprehensive effort to bring a simple deployment (3-4 servers, no High Availability) up to the latest PSUs is typically less than a day per environment. That includes an analysis of existing patches, the patching itself as well as any prerequisites, and a post-check verification to confirm all patches applied are properly indicated in the corresponding inventories.

An initial patch application may take a little bit longer because there are often common prerequisites to address that don’t have to be handled with subsequent patching. There are also considerations like bringing WebLogic up to the latest patch level, as well as one-offs like the fixes for the Equifax-discovered vulnerabilities, that don’t happen frequently. Once you’ve got a solid base of primary critical patching, additional patching events are typically shorter.

Patching can be tricky. Documentation can often be ambiguous, whether it be an unintended omission or even assumed knowledge based on an implied experience or understanding of the product. Sometimes post-install instructions get skipped or SQL statements do not get executed properly as part of the patch. Less experienced resources typically only patch the EPMSystem11R1 Oracle Home; however, did you know that Oracle’s ADF framework also has an Opatch directory under oracle_common? Possibly because those are often prereqs. But what about Oracle Data Integrator (ODI) and Oracle HTTP Server (OHS)? They also may have applicable OPatches. Who knows what you’re missing? We do! Let’s button it up.

Contact us for more details.

Laser Tag for Cloud Analytics

A friendly game of laser tag between out-of-shape technology consultants became a small gold mine of analytics simply by combining the power of Essbase and the built-in data visualization features of Oracle Analytics Cloud (OAC)! As a “team building activity,” a group of Edgewater Ranzal consultants recently decided to play a thrilling children’s game of laser tag one evening.  At the finale of the four-game match, we were each handed a score card with individual match results and other details such as who we hit, who hit us, where we got hit, and hit percentage based on shots taken.  Winners gained immediate bragging rights, but for the losers, it served as proof that age really isn’t just a number (my lungs, my poor collapsing lungs).  BUT…we quickly decided that it would be fun to import this data into OAC to gain further insight about what just happened.

Analyzing Results in Essbase

Using Smart View, a comprehensive tool for accessing and integrating EPM and BI content from Microsoft Office products, we sent the data straight to Essbase (included in the OAC platform) from Excel, where we could then apply the power of Essbase to slice the data by dimensions and add calculated metrics. The dimensions selected were:

  • Metrics (e.g. score, hit %)
  • Game (e.g.Game 1, Game 2, Total),
  • Player
  • Player Hit
  • Target (e.g. front, back, shoulder)
  • Bonus (e.g. double points, rapid fire)

With Essbase’s rollup capability, dimensions can be sliced by any one item or at a “Total” level. For example, the Player dimension’s structure looks like this:

  • Players
    • Red Team
      • Red Team Player 1
      • Red Team Player 2
    • Blue Team
      • Blue Team Player 1
      • Blue Team Player 2

This provides instant score results by player, by “Total” team, or by everybody. Combined with another dimension like Player Hit, it’s easy to examine details like number of times an individual player hit another player or another team in total. You can drill in to Red Team Player 1 shot Blue Team or Red Team Player 1 shot Blue Team Player 1 to see how many times a player shot an individual player. A simple Smart View retrieval along the Player dimension shows scores by player and team, but the data is a little raw. On a simple data set such as this, it’s easy to pick out details, but with OAC, there is another way!

Laser Tag 1

Even More Insight with Oracle Analytics Cloud (OAC)

Using the data visualization features of OAC, it’s easy to build queries against the OAC Essbase cube to gain interesting insight into this friendly folly and, more importantly, answer the questions everybody had: what was the rate of friendly fire and who shot who? Building an initial pivot chart by simply dragging and dropping Essbase dimensions onto the canvas including the game number, player, score, and coloring by our Essbase metric “Bad Hits” (a calculated metric built in Essbase to show when a player hit a teammate), we discovered who had poor aim…

Laser Tag 2

Dan from the Blue team immediately stands out as does Kevin and Wayne from the Red team!  This points us in the right direction, but we can easily toggle to another visualization that might offer even more insight into what went on. Using a couple of sunburst type data visualizations, we can quickly tie who was shooting and who was getting hit – filtered by the same team and then weight by the score (and also color code it by team color).

Laser Tag 3

It appears that Wayne and Kevin from the Red Team are pretty good at hitting teammates, but it is also now easy to conclude that Wayne really has it out for Kevin while Kevin is an equal opportunity shoot-you-in-the-back kind of teammate!

Reimagining the data as a scatter plot gives us a better look at the value of a player in relation to friendly fire. By dragging the “Score” Essbase metric into the size field of the chart, correlations are discovered between friendly fire and hits to the other team.  While Wayne might have had the highest number of friendly fire incidents, he also had the second highest score for the Red team.  The data shows visually that Kevin had quite a few friendly fire incidents, but he didn’t score as much (it also shows results that allow one to infer that Seema was probably hiding in a corner throughout the entire game, but that’s a different blog post).

Laser Tag 4

What Can You Imagine with the Data Driving Your Business?

By combining the power of Essbase with the drag-and-drop analytic capabilities of Oracle Analytics Cloud, discovering trends and gaining insight is very easy and intuitive. Even in a simple and fun game of laser tag, results and trends are found that aren’t immediately obvious in Excel alone.  Imagine what it can do with the data that is driving your business!

With Oracle giving credits for a 30-day trial, getting started today with OAC is easy. Contact us for help!

New…and Cool Features in EDMCS

Previously on The Wonderful World of Enterprise Data Management Cloud Service (EDMCS), we highlighted some of the features offered in this new product (released on Jan 25, 2018), including packaged application adapters for PBCS/EPBCS and the visual cues provided in the user interface as you modify master data. With the 18.03 release, subtle but helpful features have been added, and this post shares details of those along with useful tips resulting from actual project work done with one of three clients selected for the EDMCS Early Adopter Program. This client has fully embraced Oracle EPM Cloud by utilizing EDMCS, Financial Consolidation and Close Cloud Service (FCCS), Planning and Budgeting Cloud Service (PBCS), Account Reconciliation Cloud Service (ARCS), and Customer Data Management Cloud (CDM), along with on-premise Financial Data Quality Management Enterprise Edition (FDMEE).

Incremental Dimension Import

You now have two options available for import: Full (reset dimension) or Incremental. Full operates as expected and will completely erase and replace your dimension. All history will be lost. Certainly, a helpful feature when first seeding EDMCS, but a feature to be used carefully.

Incremental allows you to incrementally update property assignments during an import. Why is that important or useful? Because sometimes another system is point-of-entry and is feeding a new extract to EDMCS. Those extracts are typically complete data extracts (not incremental), so the incremental feature allows you to update new or changed property assignments without completely erasing your dimension.

*One important clarification – even when performing an incremental import, the complete set of node relationships must be imported as all parent-child relationships will be replaced. The “incremental” piece of the import applies to updating the changed property values of those node relationships.

New Features in EDMCS 1

Metadata Object Search

The search feature for objects (views, node sets, hierarchy sets, applications, etc.) has been expanded to include name and description. Enter your search text, and any object that contains the matching text in either the name or description is returned in the search results.

Node Search

Like the metadata object search, the node search in a viewpoint has been enhanced to include name and description. You do not need to toggle between name and description like in Data Relationship Management (DRM); instead, enter your search text and any node containing that text in the name or description is returned.

Request Load Files

EDMCS provides the capability to directly load Excel files, and a great way to start creating your request file is to use the download feature in EDMCS. Download a viewpoint (either the entire viewpoint or from the selected node and its descendants) to Excel, and you now have the basis for your request file: the complete “hierarchy” in Excel including parent, child, and all properties with the correct property labels as column headers in Excel. You can then modify the Excel file by adding an Action Code column and including the relevant node relationships and properties you wish to include in your request file.

*One note: If you need to modify top nodes in a request load file, you must include the Parent Node Type column. The column can be blank for the top nodes, but the column itself must be present. You can always modify top nodes interactively in a request.

Summary

While these features like incremental import and improved search function may seem minor, it’s often the little things that end up making a big difference when you put them all together. And it’s exciting to see this type of functionality being added so soon after the initial release.

Check back regularly for new updates and insights as EDMCS continues to evolve and mature -we’ll keep sharing! We’d love to hear your questions and observations related to EDMCS and how it fits into the ecosystem of Oracle EPM Cloud, so please comment below or contact us to share your experiences.

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Easy Value with FDMEE Reports

Strolling into work sipping coffee, the realization soon hits that information is needed out of Financial Data Quality Management Enterprise Edition (FDMEE) for internal audit.  After logging in to Data Management, what happens?? We freeze!  And the questions begin swirling in our heads:  How do we get data out of FDMEE?  What are the drivers needed to do that?  What tools are needed to write an FDMEE report and from where do we get them?

At this point, it is often easier to evaluate existing reports within the application for what they lack rather than start creating a report from scratch and then modify and/or update them to meet our specific needs.

A Variety of Report Options

FDMEE Reports does not equal Financial Reports. From within the application, there are numerous options available to choose from for reports.  Most of these are updated reports from FDM Classic.  These groups help to focus on and categorize common reports together and provide information on the following:

  1. Audit Reports display all transactions for all locations that compose the balance of a target account
  2. Check Reports provide information on the issues encountered when data load rules are run
  3. Base Trial Balance Reports provide detail on how source data is processed
  4. Listing Reports summarize metadata and settings (such as the import format, or check rule) by the current location
  5. Location Analysis reports provide dimension mapping by the current location
  6. Process Monitor Reports shows locations and their positions within the data conversion process
  7. Variance Reports display source and trial balance accounts for one target account, showing data over two periods or categories
  8. Intersection Reports identify invalid HFM data load intersections

Below is a screen shot of the default FDMEE report groups:FDMEE Reports 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Getting Started

While the canned reports are a great start, creating custom reports allows more creativity and only requires the following:

  1. Microsoft Word (2010+)
  2. Oracle BI Publisher 11.1.1.7 or 11.1.1.9
  3. Working knowledge of SQL
  4. Working knowledge of the FDMEE database tables

First, if you do not currently have Microsoft Word installed, this process isn’t going to work.  After confirming your version of Word, navigate to Oracle to download the BI Publisher software. (http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/middleware/bi-publisher/downloads/index-101746.html).

After installing the software, an access toolbar will become available:

FDMEE Reports 2

This is where the good nerdy stuff happens!  You need to write a query, via SQL*Developer or SMSS that can then be dropped into FDMEE to produce an XML.  In FDMEE, the query will produce an XML that contains the first 100 rows when you test/validate.  This XML file is what you can bring into BI Publisher (via Word) to produce your report.  Below is a screen shot of FDMEE-generated download for Word:

FDMEE Reports 3

And YES! FDMEE CAN Accept Inputs

FDMEE has the ability to have many prompts.  The information can be user input or a selection from a drop-down.  This information can be gathered/compiled in multiple smaller report queries or from out-of-the-box drop-downs.  Below is a sample FDMEE report with input parameters:

FDMEE Reports 4

Ample Value

Custom FDMEE Reports can be valuable in many ways.  For example, reports can be written to:

  1. Provide Data Compare analysis for data validation activities
  2. Track how many times an end user has exported data for a specific period
  3. Download the maps for a location to Excel
  4. List all the Journals posted by period and category
  5. List all the maps modification activity by date range
  6. List all the location and category and provides the status of each POV

Each of the report styles listed above has provided valuable information to both auditors as well as the administrators of the FDMEE application.   One of the most valuable reports is the one that permits quick data validations and reconciliations because it helps with COA conversions as well as upgrades to the EPM suite.  Here is a sample of a custom journal listing report:

FDMEE Reports 5

…and a custom FDMEE process monitor report:

FDMEE Reports 6

The Verdict

The possibilities and use of FDMEE for supplemental reporting is not limited to trial-balance analysis, trending, or variance reports. Reports are often created to provide additional valuable information for auditors, data workflow analysis, or external and downstream systems.  In many cases, they are used to provide additional and supplemental detail to IT or Financial auditors.  The verdict:  there is easy value added with variety and simplicity with FDMEE Reports.

Contact us at info@ranzal.com with questions about this product.

Enterprise Data Management Cloud Service (EDMCS) – First Impressions

Continuing its momentum with Enterprise Performance Management (EPM) Cloud initiatives, Oracle recently released Enterprise Data Management Cloud Service (EDMCS). Here are some initial impressions of the application to provide fundamental information and spark discussion.

First, some background: these observations are based on an actual project from working with a client who was 1 of 3 selected for the EDMCS Early Adopter Program. This client is essentially going all-in on Oracle EPM Cloud, with Planning and Budgeting Cloud Service (PBCS), Financial Consolidation and Close Cloud Service (FCCS), and Account Reconciliation Cloud Service (ARCS). One on-premise component, Financial Data Quality Management Enterprise Edition (FDMEE), is also in the mix. This client quickly realized its reporting structures between the Planning/Budgeting and Financial Close/Consolidation worlds, while not identical, were similar and contained a high degree of shared structures. The idea of maintaining these reporting structures in multiple tools did not make sense, leading the client to inquire about EDMCS. After an evaluation, Oracle selected them to participate in the early adopter program for EDMCS with Edgewater Ranzal as the implementation partner.

EDMCS = DRM in the Cloud, Right?

Well, not exactly, but that’s not necessarily the right question to ask. EDMCS is NOT a lift-and-shift of Data Relationship Management (DRM) to the Cloud. Yes, there are similar concepts and constructs in EDMCS that a DRM administrator will quickly grasp (Add/Insert/Delete/Remove of members, Shared members, properties, and node types to name a few). But EDMCS utilizes a different philosophy to manage your enterprise master data along with a different data model, all geared around effective master data management for EPM Cloud products. It’s crucial to adopt a new mindset as you embrace EDMCS and not be constrained by “this is how DRM did it.”

With EDMCS, you will immediately notice new functionality such as the capability to create an Enterprise Planning and Budgeting Cloud Service (EPBCS) or PBCS application in EDMCS, which provides the built-in connectors, properties, and validations for those target applications. Simply step through the Register Application wizard, specify your dimensions and plan types, and EDMCS will automatically build the rest for you. The built-in properties and validations enforce constraints and business rules to ensure no changes can be made that could break EPBCS/PBCS.

For other use cases, EDMCS provides the ability to create a custom application along with custom properties. As EDMCS matures, the number of packaged connectors, applications, and validations will surely increase.

So, the Data Model is Different?

The EDMCS data model is quite different from DRM. Understanding the EDMCS data chain is crucial to effective administration, especially given new concepts such as Viewpoints, Hierarchy Sets, and Node Sets.

Key data objects include:

  • Node Type – a collection of nodes and associated properties for your application
  • Hierarchy Set – defines the parent-child relationships of nodes
  • Node Set – defines a group of nodes available for a viewpoint. This may include all nodes in a hierarchy set or a subset of nodes
  • Viewpoint – the other data objects come together to provide the viewpoint, which is essentially the “hierarchy” you interact with to modify nodes, parent-child relationships, and properties

The diagram below, taken from the Oracle EDMCS Administration Guide, is a useful reference as you start to build out your EDMCS applications. Future blog posts will explore these key constructs in more detail.

EDMCS Figure 1

Does EDMCS include Data Relationship Governance (DRG)?

Not yet, but workflows, approvals, separation of duties, and other data governance goodness is on the roadmap for EDMCS. But fear not! EDMCS already provides a “request” mechanism. Modifications to master data can only be performed within the context of a request. Requests can include interactive changes through the UI or batch loading of changes through an Excel request file (think of request files like automator or action scripts, but easier to use and yes, in Excel!). Comments can be included with a request and, continuing with one of the strongest features of DRM, requests provide auditability by capturing the who/what/when/where of every change performed in EDMCS.

How is the User Interface?

One of my favorite features is the visual feedback EDMCS provides as you make changes within a request. As you add, insert, remove, delete, reorder, or modify a member, visual icons and highlights are displayed for that member in real-time to capture the action being performed on that member. You basically get a preview of the change before it’s committed. Changes to properties are visually highlighted and easy to spot. Validations are performed as the request is in Draft status and instantly flag any violations with error messages highlighting the problem node and issue.

Summary

Overall, EDMCS is an exciting entry into the EPM Cloud market and a foundational tool critical to maximizing your EPM Cloud investment. While DRM administrators will experience an adjustment period as they learn EDMCS due to the data chain and new terminology, they will be pleasantly surprised with the available functionality such as pre-packaged connectors and properties for PBCS/EPBCS, the use of requests (and did I mention you can load Excel files?!), and the real-time visual feedback as you modify and validate your master data.